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by Dominic Umile

23 Feb 2011


Dave “2562” Huismans marked a significant step forward for bass music in 2009 on Unbalance, where his marriage of dub techno, inventive drum programming, and hazy UK garage textures improved upon his Aerial by miles and makes for one of the few flawless dubstep-borne full-lengths to date. In fact, driven by stuttering and powerful beats that are more prominent than any other element at work, “Aquatic Family Affair” begins in the same minimal and punchy manner that Unbalance‘s “Flashback” does. It’s reportedly built only of disco samples (as is all of his forthcoming Fever LP), but there’s no semblance of source material on either side here. Instead, Huismans establishes the audio tour suggested by the A-side’s title: the course of a sleek submarine, prowling alien depths. Bubbling synths mimic the scene at 20,000 leagues before the producer peppers his enigmatic “Aquatic” with ugly, detuned vibe loops if only just for a couple of measures. It’s part of a bold evolution for this guy—from hard-edged, early-career Tectonic 12-inch singles to the disembodied breakbeat stuff he’s producing now, Huismans is confusing the hell out of anyone still trying to make sense of today’s oft-splintering, bass-heavy dance music subgenres.

Fever is out April 4 on When In Doubt (tour dates after the jump).

by Cynthia Fuchs

23 Feb 2011


Martin Scorsese’s documentary makes clear how Fran Lebowitz both lives in and embodies New York City. Not only is she repeatedly pictured on sidewalks, in her favorite West Village restaurant (the Waverly Inn), or driving her 1978 Checker cab, but she also performs an attitude associated with the city. Sardonic, impatient, and incisive, she explains here how she came to her art—writing—as this is a function of her worldview. As a cabdriver, she says, she worked just enough to “hang out.” She goes on, “It’s very important for getting ideas or thinking new things, sitting in bars, smoking cigarettes: that’s the history of art.”

See PopMattersreview.

by Cynthia Fuchs

22 Feb 2011


Wherever it begins or ends, Paul Green’s act is a compelling one. “My ego,” he says, “is as big as the whole universe. I invented something so I could be the best at it.” His invention, launched in 1998, is the Paul Green School of Rock Music. He means to teach his students how to rock, to absorb and spit out the rockin’ spirit typically attributed to the devil: Jack-Blackishly, he demands to know, “Do you love Satan?” That is, he wants the kids (ages eight to 18) to feel the awesome power of Music with a big M. Green’s irrepressible theory and practice are on display in Don Argott’s lively, smart, and weirdly enchanting 2005 documentary, Rock School. It screens at the IFC Center on 22 February at 8pm, as part of Stranger Than Fiction‘s Winter Season, followed by a Q&A with Argott.

See PopMattersreview.

by Allison Taich

16 Feb 2011


Baltimore’s the Bridge released their fifth studio album, National Bohemian, 1 February 2011 on Woodberry Records/Thirty Tigers. The album is an Americana stew of blues, rock, funk, soul and jam, seasoned with a dash of Cajun spice. National Bohemian is a spirited release that road trips across the U.S., trucking day and night through mountains of emotions and sunny pastures of optimism. Check out the video of “Rosie” off National Bohemian.

The Bridge is currently on tour supporting Tea Leaf Green, then Galactic, followed by a string of headlining U.S. dates.

by Eric Allen Been

16 Feb 2011


Two decades ago, dance music visionary Carl Craig helped marshal in the second wave of Detroit techno by launching the leftfield-leaning label Planet E. To commemorate the 20th anniversary of the imprint, Craig is set to release on 22 February a Planet E “best of” digital compilation entitled 20 F@#&ING Years - We Ain’t Dead. The 25-track project will include electronic music classics like Moodymann’s “Dem Young Sconies” and Innerzone Orchestra’s “Bug in the Bassbin”, along with next-generation mindbenders like Recloose’s “Can’t Take It [ft. Dwele]” and a previously unreleased remix by Craig of Kenny Larkin’s “You Are”.

And in conjunction with the digital release, Craig will be hosting on his website craigcarl.net a competition for fans to vote on tracks that should be pressed onto a limited edition Planet E vinyl box set. 

Finally, starting in March Planet E will also began releasing singles from its back catalogue, which will chosen and remixed by, among others, Ricardo Villalobos, Richie Hawtin, Kevin Saunderson and Mad Mike Banks. First up will be a Luciano remix of Recloose’s “Can’t Take It”.

The tracklisting for the compilation and the dates for Craig’s Planet E tour are listed below.

Scion A/V Presents: Carl Craig Interview from Scion A/V on Vimeo.

Latest tracks by carlcraignet

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