Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Thursday, Jul 8, 2010

The surprise show is one of the greatest things that can happen to a concert fan. And one of the reasons I love surprise concerts is because they catch fans completely off guard. Whether the surprise concert lasts for only one song or goes on for an entire set, fans always get lifted off their feet. So, let’s see how Lenny Kravitz, Robert Plant, Jimmy Buffet and Dr. Dre and Timbaland set their fans floating home on cloud nine.


Ask any concert fan and they’ll tell you nothing beats being surprised at a show when one of your favorite artists walks on stage unexpectedly. Because the moment is so intense and unbelievable, the surprise concert instantly becomes unique from any other concert that you’ve experienced before.


I don’t know if it’s just that time of year, but these last few weeks have been prime time for surprising concert fans all over the globe. So, here’s a list of artists who gave their fans a memorable moment of rock and awe.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Thursday, Jul 1, 2010
When was the last time you seen a tribute that moved a celebrity to tears?

This past Sunday night, the Daytime Emmy Awards managed to do something that many televised awards ceremonies only try to do: create a truly moving moment.


The show set aside nearly ten minutes to honor TV personality Dick Clark and the show he hosted for nearly 32 years, American Bandstand. Friend and business associate Ryan Seacrest ushered in video clips containing words of praise from Garth Brooks, Cher, Frankie Avalon, American Idol’s Simon Cowell, and Barry Manilow, whose “Bandstand Boogie” served as the show’s theme song from the 1970s onward, and others. After Tony Orlando, Marie Osmond, Chubby Checker, the Spinners, and the cast of Jersey Boys gathered together to sing that theme, the cameras cut to Dick Clark. He was so moved that he began to cover his face with his hand to hide the tears.


As CBS cut to a commercial break, I first wondered why this was a part of the Daytime Emmys, of all shows. It was only then that I realized that years ago, Bandstand aired during the afternoon. Looking back on all of the musical history that show contained, and looking to what modern daytime TV is, I was shocked. Although there has several attempts to bring the show back since its cancellation in 1989, none of them has succeeded. In 2005, some of these efforts resulted in FOX’s So You Think You Can Dance, but that show barely resembles the original. 


The real question is why we haven’t seen a similar tribute on other, music-themed award shows. The American Music Awards, produced by Dick Clark Productions, probably doesn’t want to seem like its honoring a part of itself, while the Grammy’s seem to be reluctant to link musical history with television history, despite the fact that their ceremonies are televised. Either way, The 37th Annual Daytime Emmy Awards’ have laid down the gauntlet on how tributes should be done.



Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Thursday, Jun 24, 2010
"Bespoke: The Handbuilt Bicycle" / The Museum of Art and Design / New York / May 13 - August 15, 2010

Casual cyclists and confirmed bike fanatics alike will appreciate (and yes, probably drool over) this spare, beautifully curated exhibition featuring handbuilt bicycles. 


Bike builders include Sacha White of Vanilla Bicycles based in Portland, OR, Italian designer Dario Pegoretti, and Peter Weigle of JP Weigle Cycles in Lyme, CT. 


The bicycles shown are gorgeous (luscious powder coats, hand-tooled leather seats) but also represent technical innovation in the shape of ultra-lite frames, unique cargo solutions, and specially designed off-road tires. The exhibition carries a healthy dose of whimsy: a favorite piece is the Delilah Sue tricycle, designed by White for his young daughter. It isn’t difficult to see why Vanilla Bicycles currently has a five-year-long waiting list. 


Bespoke reminds us that bicycles can serve many functions. They’re an extension of personality, a purely practical way to get around town, or a statement about energy consumption. Yet above all, this collection of bikes represents the most appealing aesthetics in two-wheeled design.


[Gallery]


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Wednesday, Jun 23, 2010
by PopMatters Staff

Chalk this up to people who have far too much time on their hands. AP interviews rabid fans of the Twilight franchise who are literally camping out in Los Angeles days in advance of the premiere to be the first ones to see the new film The Twilight Saga: Eclipse opening 24 June at the Los Angeles Film Festival. The film opens in wide release 30 June, but these die-hards want to be ahead of the masses on this one. That extra six-day wait would just be too much for art of this caliber, I guess.



Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Tuesday, Jun 22, 2010

Since 1970, the Glastonbury Festival for Contemporary Performing Arts in England has been a staple for music festivals all over the world. It began 40 years ago (although this isn’t the 40th time the festival has taken place. There have been several years where Glastonbury did not happen), when Marc Bolan, Keith Christmas, Stackridge, Al Stewart and Quintessence played for 1,500 music fans on a farm in Pilton, UK. Back then, the price for admission was £1 including free milk from the farm.


A lot has changed in the past four decades. Glastonbury is now regularly attended by more than 100,000 people each year and tickets run well over £200. This year’s event is being headlined by Gorillaz, Muse and Stevie Wonder.


In honor of the 2010 Glastonbury Festival, which takes place from 24th June - 27th June, we take a look at back at some of the most memorable performances in the festival’s history after the jump…


Tagged as: glastonbury
Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements
PopMatters' LUCY Giveaway! in PopMatters's Hangs on LockerDome

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.