Call for Music Writers... Rock, Indie, Urban, Electronic, Americana, Metal, World and More

Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Tuesday, Jun 18, 2013
According to the sicario, many unrecovered bodies are buried in safe houses, backyards and city buildings, places he can't recall or never knew. He may be lying. And he may not.

“The job of a sicario is to do away with the victim immediately, either with a bullet, a knife or a blow.” As he speaks, the hooded subject of El Sicario—Room 164 writes in a notebook, a numbered list of the weapons he names. “Quick and lean,” he continues, “So that the victim feels nothing more.” In answer to his own question, “How?”, he begins to draw a childlike outline of a car and to explain the difference between a professional sicario and an imitation sicario. Where the pretender fires dozens of bullets at a car—here he stabs at the page, bullet-dots all over the car he’s drawn—the real thing takes aim, needing only one shot to get the job done.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Jun 17, 2013
Katherine Fairfax Wright and Malika Zouhali-Worrall spend a year with David Kato, tracking this bold gay rights activist's efforts and confidence, his infectious good humor and his terrific charisma.

It took David Kato some time to discover his calling, his identity as a gay man in Uganda and, beyond that, as a courageous fighter for gay civil rights. As he recalls in Call Me Kuchu, he came to his self-understanding when he left Uganda, briefly, in 1992. On arriving in South Africa, he remembers, he stayed at a YMCA. “I saw these men on the street,” he says, and when he asked what they were selling, wondering whether it was “gold or diamonds,” he was told they were selling themselves. He was further surprised when he learned that these men sold themselves to other men. “I said, ‘For what?’” Here David exaggerates his response, cocking his head to the side. “I said, ‘Ahh.’ And I’ve always wanted men, so I went to the street.” Returning to Uganda, he cofounded SMUG (Sexual Minorities Uganda), and took up a series of public and legal campaigns against various sorts of homophobia, particularly concerning newspapers outing and targeting individuals. The filmmakers, Katherine Fairfax Wright and Malika Zouhali-Worrall, spend a year with Kato, tracking and commending his efforts and confidence, his infectious good humor and his terrific charisma.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Jun 17, 2013
Even as the film looks at intersections between art and experience, it also notes their sometimes devastating distinctions.

“I can only make about four steps forward before I touch the door, and if I turn in an about face at any place in this cell, I’m gonna bump into something.” As Herman Wallace speaks, you see a black screen at the start of Herman’s House. Angad Bhall’s documentary goes on to make visceral, if not precisely visible, the small space this Angola prison inmate describes. Living in solitary confinement for over 41 years, the 71-year-old Wallace corresponds throughout the film with artist Jackie Sumell, who has made it her life’s project to build the house Herman has imagined, the house he might move to when he’s released, and also to make public his cruel and unusual punishment with gallery installations, a series of replicas of his tiny cell.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Jun 10, 2013
Highlighting the month’s top releases in movies, music, television, and video games.

June brings us the start of summer movie blockbusters, but there’s plenty of other types of entertainment available this month. If you’re also wondering what addictive video game hits the shelves soon, what albums are vying for song of the summer status, or which recently renewed TV series is only just now wrapping up its first season, read on.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Jun 3, 2013
The Buffy creator made some other points, too.

There’s one every year—a commencement address that goes viral and pops up all over the Internet. Remember the Wellesley High School English teacher who looked the Class of 2012 in the eye and intoned, “You are not special”? Remember David Foster Wallace’s 2005 “This is Water” speech to Kenyon College?


Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements
PopMatters' LUCY Giveaway! in PopMatters's Hangs on LockerDome

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.