Latest Blog Posts

by Faye Rasmussen

22 Sep 2009


Where does one truly find inspiration?  The directorial debut of Rob Perez, writer of 40 Days and 40 Nights, presses to answer that exact question.

Lindeman (played by Sam Rosen), a sculptor with his art school final project in front of him, finds himself simply stumped. He looks for inspiration around every corner, in every scene. This includes the goth scene, the gay scene, becoming an intellect, a lover and a vegan, but nothing seems to be the answer to his artistic existential crisis. He realizes that being a nobody defines somebody.

The movie is also accompanied by a musical score and soundtrack completed and compiled by Guster’s lead singer Ryan Miller, who also, impressively enough, co-wrote the movie with Rob Perez. The film premieres Thursday, October 1 at the State Theatre in Minneapolis, MN.

Watch and re-watch the trailer until then.

by Jesse Steele

18 Sep 2009


What does a director famous for his awkward, dry comedies do when he has squeezed all of the sarcastic strangeness out of real life actors?  Apparently, he turns to animation. In his new stop-motion film, Fantastic Mr. Fox (based on the Roald Dahl children’s book of the same name), director Wes Anderson (Rushmore, The Royal Tenenbaums, The Darjeeling Limited) enlists the help of some of his old favorites, including Rushmore screen mates Bill Murray and Jason Bateman, to give voice to his woodland creatures. Although the failure of Tim Burton’s new film 9 to live up to its fantastic trailer should serve as a word of caution to film-goers looking into the genre of “animated film with a wonderful trailer by a notoriously strange director”, I for one am hoping this film rings true to the high tone the hilarious trailer sets.

by Jesse Steele

18 Sep 2009


So yes, it’s a bit on the experimental side, but this new short film “Artificial Paradise, Inc.” by Jp Frenay is too visually stunning to be ignored. Not sure exactly what’s going on? Don’t worry, no one is, but the description Frenay gives may help a little, or not:

“an experimental film anticipating a future where a major corporation has developed an unique software, based on organic virtual reality, which holds all the lost memories of humankind. A user connects to this database of the forgotten…what is he searching for?”

Aside from incredible work in computer graphics wrapped in some vague notion of plot many post-modern video artists are notorious for, I’m not really sure what anyone is searching for in this film, but it is somehow beautiful just the same.

ARTIFICIAL PARADISE,INC. from Jp Frenay on Vimeo.

by Matt Mazur

17 Sep 2009


In 2002, Moore was considered a heavy favorite to win the Oscar for her excellent lead work as Cathy Whitaker in Todd Haynes’ Far from Heaven or her equally powerful supporting in Stephen Daldry’s The Hours as Laura Brown. Joining a list that includes Emma Thompson and Sigourney Weaver, she went home empty-handed that fateful night.

Deja-vu: watch out for her upcoming two-category sweep in 2010: First up is a much-discussed lead turn in Atom Egoyan’s Chloe, a sexually-charged drama in which Moore’s tony doctor hires an escort (Amanda Seyfried) to bed her husband. Remember that nobody does “sexually-charged” quite like Moore. This is the woman who gave us Boogie Nights’ Amber Waves and the tawdry, delicious Savage Grace last year, after all.

Then comes the pièce de résistance for the awards season: Moore’s supporting turn in designer-turned-film director Tom Ford’s A Single Man, opposite Colin Firth as a gay man who has just lost his long-time lover.

by Matt Mazur

17 Sep 2009


Garcia is one of the premiere contemporary storytellers of women’s stories—his Things You Can Tell Just by Looking at Her and Nine Lives are must-sees—this year he directs Naomi Watts, Kerry Washington, and the much-buzzed about Annette Bening in an eloquent tale about motherhood. Expect Bening to be at the Oscars again!

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Moving Pixels Podcast: Coming of Age When 'Life Is Strange'

// Moving Pixels

"Time travelling and selfies are the central conceits of Life Is Strange.

READ the article