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Still exploring the ambits of hip-hop grooves and jazzy sonics, Turkish rapper and beatmaker Da Poet adds yet another album of instrumentals to his repertoire of work. Last year’s instrumentals collection, Beattape, dipped into artfully lush chill-out and marked the artist’s crossover success, gaining attention overseas with hip-hop and downtempo aficionados. The rapper’s latest is mainly a collection of instrumentals from his 2011 album, Poetika, which was a sizeable hit in Turkey’s underground hip-hop scene. Stripped bare of Da Poet’s earnest and fluid raps, all emphasis is placed on the rapper’s most overlooked skill: his ability to create haunting and evocative melodies.

Indie bands are a dime a dozen these days, as made evident by the veritable deluge of bands from Brooklyn that continues to put out release after release of low-key, guitar-driven rock. The trio that calls itself Dreamers also calls Brooklyn its home base, but as its latest song “Wolves” evinces, it is able to rise above the masses through one simple tactic: writing a fantastic chorus. Using the folksy wisdom of the main refrain “If you lie down with wolves / You learn to howl” as an anchor, Dreamers craft a tune that’s likely to have people singing along with the song’s lupine aphorism.

Having now just dropped its debut, the Portland, Oregon-based Hawks Do Not Share have now readied their latest music video for the public eye. The song, “Break Even”, features a submerged, echoey vocal that fans of Chelsea Wolfe will find appeal in. Hawks Do Not Share, however, opt for a murky synth background to the vocals rather than that goth chanteuse‘s dark, guitar-driven rock.

The Detroit, Michigan-based outfit Alejandra O’Leary and the Champions of the West are set to release a new LP soon, and leading up to the release the group is offering single “Skin to Skin” as a download.

“Stella”, a track off of the forthcoming album by the St. Louis retro rockers the Feed, opens with the sound of a dog barking. It’s a fitting way to tease the tune that’s to come; though indebted in large part to the great classic rock bands of yore, the group brings its own unique energy to this solid cut. Particularly noticeable is its wonderful use of electric organ; in the verses, the chords are pumped with a staccato pop zeal, and as the song comes to its conclusion there is a break section where the organ comes to the forefront. This is the kind of songwriting that makes the phrase “rock and roll ain’t noise pollution” true still today.

//Mixed media
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"Island of Lemurs: Madagascar" Is Cute but Spooky

// Short Ends and Leader

"This flick is a superficial but eye-popping survey for armchair nature tourists.

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