Latest Blog Posts

by John Lindstedt

27 Jan 2010


Lost fans still have a couple “Faradays” between them and the premiere of the show’s final season, but there’s no shortage of web goodies to appease those who can’t help but froth at the mouth in anticipation.

First and foremost is the web series Mysteries of the Universe: The Dharma Initiative, a cleverly crafted faux doc filtered through a nostalgic 80’s motif in the vein of Carl Sagan’s Cosmos. Within the Lost universe, the series had a short run in 1982 on ABC, and it sheds light on the enigmatic Dharma Initiative that figure prominently in the story’s overall mythology. Released in a five parts over the course of last year, what could have been a disposable bonus feature is both satisfying and more than a little creepy.

by Conrad Hughes

26 Jan 2010


A new edition of the forthcoming Final Fantasy XIII has been detailed in a press release from Square Enix. It’s going to cost £59.99 and will contain a soundtrack CD by Masashi Hamauzu, a hardcover art book and weirdly, a fake tattoo transfer of the game’s logo.

It’s a bit of a shame that the music isn’t series staple Nobuo Uematsu this time round—the Final Fantasy piano collections by him are excellent. Hopefully, we can expect a similar level of quality from the CD this time. Take a listen to the battle theme and tell us what you think. Is it worth the extra £20?

by Ian Chant

16 Jan 2010


You probably recognize Ashley Greene as Alice, the psychic member of the sexy, undead Cullen clan in Twilight and New Moon, in theaters now. Yeah, you’ve seen the movies. Just admit it. Soon, you’ll see her in another guilty pleasure, the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue, due in just a few weeks. Greene sat down with PopMatters writer Ian Chant for a brief interview to talk about body paint, her upcoming film Skateland, and how to have a film career after being one of Hollywood’s most recognizable bloodsuckers for years.

by Tyler Gould

6 Oct 2009


The consequences of death are given no thought in most video games, where, even in the most open-ended games, the player’s role is that of an iterator, mechanically moving the plot from one position to another, engaging the game by turning pages and being allowed access to new experiences. The threat of death creates the illusion of challenge, though in modern games it simply results in a restart at the most recent checkpoint.

In You Only Live Once, death is the point, as are grief and liability, and had me laughing both at the game and myself, in that it never occurred to me, after all the platforms I’ve jumped short of, that Mario may have broken his neck as he hit the ground.

by Ashley Cooper

2 Oct 2009


Well-known actress Drew Barrymore makes her directorial debut with Whip It, the story of a Texas teenage girl Bliss (Ellen Page) who decides to rebel against her beauty pageant upbringing and trades in her chances for a crown in for a pair of roller skates to enter the world of roller derby. “You are my new hero,” Bliss tells one roller derby star who she watches pass out flyers for an upcoming event. The derby star tells her, “Well, grab a pair of skates and be your own hero.” Her mother (portrayed by Marcia Gay Harden) vehemently disapproves against her choice and makes her opinions known as her father secretly supports her efforts.

The movie is about relationships, focuses on female empowerment and the world of derby gives Bliss the opportunity to find out where she belongs, make some friends and find herself along the way.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Best of the Moving Pixels Podcast: Further Explorations of the Zero

// Moving Pixels

"We continue our discussion of the early episodes of Kentucky Route Zero by focusing on its third act.

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