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Friday, Jul 30, 2010
You can admit that you never thought Vanilla Ice would ever hold any kind of influence over any developments in any area of the music industry. You’d be in good company. Unfortunately, you’d also be wrong.

It’s okay. You can admit that you never thought Vanilla Ice would ever hold any kind of influence over any developments in any area of the music industry. You’d be in good company.  Unfortunately, you’d also be wrong.


Here’s Vanilla Ice with the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles back in 1991:


Now, here’s Vanilla Ice in 1998:


And below are the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles in 2007. Just please, if you’re anywhere in public, turn off the volume on this clip, as Raphael’s signature sarcasm seems to have matured into some righteous, profane anger over the years:


Would Master Splinter advise some kind of supergroup tour?


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Friday, Jul 30, 2010

Travis frontman Fran Healy is set to release his first solo album, Wreckorder, on October 5th. The first single, “Buttercups”, is now available for streaming on Healy’s website. The new album boasts some impressive guests such as Neko Case who duets with Healy on “Sing Me to Sleep”, as well as Paul McCartney playing bass on “As It Comes”.


[Stream]


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Friday, Jul 30, 2010

French duo Jamaica, formerly Poney Poney, have just released the video for their latest single “Short & Entertaining”. Brimming with feverish stop-start guitars and breezy fuzz-pop melodies, the track is a three-minute, foot-stomping statement of intent. If that wasn’t enough, as a bonus for thrash metal/French pop crossover fans, the video features a cameo from founding member of Sepultura, Igor Cavalera. “Short & Entertaining” will be released on August 16th through Co-op Music. With their debut album No Problem (produced by one half of Justice) coming a week later.



Tagged as: dance, electro, france, jamaica
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Thursday, Jul 29, 2010

Just a girl and her ukulele, Denver singer-songwriter Danielle Ate the Sandwich (aka - Danielle Anderson) has been generating support for her third album, Two Bedroom Apartment through YouTube. A sonic wedding between Joni Mitchel and Death Cab for Cutie, Danielle’s earnest lyrics and clear, beautiful soprano voice are a staple of her repertoire—as are kicky arrangements on originals and unexpected covers. Although she flies solo on YouTube renditions of her songs, on Two Bedroom Apartment, Danielle is backed by a talented group of musicians (who also accompanied her on a rollicking, folk-edged cover of Lady Gaga’s “Bad Romance” at the album’s release party). Apparently, the YouTube buzz has been paying off as Danielle Ate the Sandwich will be playing the Mile High Festival’s Wolf Stage in August along with the likes of Weezer and Train.



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Thursday, Jul 29, 2010
by PopMatters Staff
The inspired "No, no, no, no / No, no, no" chant sounds like the blues incarnate, and Randolph’s whirring pedal steel is the sound of pain filtered through an instrument.

Steel guitar blues master Robert Randolph and band delve into the roots of blues and R&B on their latest album We Walk This Road. Randolph and producer T Bone Burnett mined the American musical archives for the record to produce something of an ode to 20th century American music. Along the way, Randolph and his ace band rework songs by John Lennon, Bob Dylan, and Prince, as well as older tunes. Today we have the pleasure of premiering a live video performance of “Traveling Shoes” produced by Yours Truly that includes an enlightening interview segment.


Today in his review of the album for PopMatters, Ryan Reed said of “Traveling Shoes”: “Burnett’s influence behind the boards is felt immediately, with Marcus Randolph’s drums pounding, bone-dry and big. It’s a stellar track with a sweltering groove—most importantly, it does exactly what the album aspires toward: merging the ancient and the current, proving the Road hasn’t changed a bit. The inspired ‘No, no, no, no / No, no, no’ chant sounds like the blues incarnate, and Randolph’s whirring pedal steel is the sound of pain filtered through an instrument.”



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