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by PopMatters Staff

17 Aug 2016


Paul Carr: The striking thing about this song is the sheer simplicity of it all. The song begins with a simple drum loop layered with downbeat synths. The defeatist opening is replaced with urgent positivity signaled by the keyboards leaping into life. The effect is like suddenly coming up to the surface after a night time swim. All of this frames the vocals perfectly. This an absolutely gorgeous vocal turn from BANKS. She manages to evoke so many emotions in such a short time. Once again she reaches out and grabs your heart. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

17 Aug 2016


Chris Ingalls: The Irish indie darlings are back with a simple, soulful track that is wrapped in lovely analog production (the drums in particular sound warm and fuzzy on headphones). The intimacy of the song, combined with Paul Noonan’s seductive crooning, could potentially put it in the running for Makeout Music Track of 2016. Cool “Star Wars” reference in the lyrics, too. [7/10]

by Cole Waterman

17 Aug 2016


Long in gestation, the full-length debut from Los Angeles-based composer/producer Johnathan Cooper’s lovelesslust is at hand. Steeped in darkwave, post-punk, industrial, and art rock, The Car Crash That Ended Her Life Came as No Surprise is a riveting, pensive work that seems to emanate from a nocturnal dimension. It lacerates in all directions, focusing ire inwardly and outwardly.

by Will Rivitz

17 Aug 2016


Vandoliers’ “Wildflower” is largely based in straightforward country music, a touch of shout-along folk-punk contouring its edges. Instrumentally, it’s a very complex song, horns trading off with strings and banjo under vocalist Joshua Fleming’s strained yell. Its instrumental complications and genre tropes fit its subject matter appropriately — it’s about the lost and broken, those from whom we’ve had to move on. It’s a dark song with a touch of brightness and hope, a tone kept consistent by the way it occasionally soars far above its gloomy guitar spine.

by Will Rivitz

17 Aug 2016


Beginners’ “Stereo”, as the title’s connotations might suggest, takes a few cues from the ‘80s. Big, watery snares are the most noticeable, with cheeky synths and schlocky strings adding to the effect. It’s very much a modern song, though — the arpeggiation, distorted bassline, and vocal chops are straight out of radio pop-house. It’s a laid-back tune as ready for blasting from a Camaro system as from Spotify, and that timelessness is a wonderful thing.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Specter of Multiplayer Hangs Over 'Door Kickers'

// Moving Pixels

"Door Kickers is not a multiplayer game, but for a while there, I couldn’t tell the difference.

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