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by PopMatters Staff

26 Jun 2012


Cosmo Jarvis is still quite young at 22, but he’s already made a substantive impact in the pop world with his story-filled songs that take unexpected twists. He’s made a fan out of Stephen Fry and I can barely think of a better endorsement that being beloved by the Noel Coward of our age. It was that “Gay Pirates” tune that broke things wide open for Jarvis and resulted in heaps of praise from leading lights in the UK press such as The Guardian and Mojo. Now Jarvis is back with his third album, Think Bigger, releasing 17 July via 25th Frame/The End.

Today we bring you the online premiere of Jarvis’ acoustic take on his new single “Love This”. Also, check out the acoustic video and the video for the album version of the song below.

by PopMatters Staff

26 Jun 2012


Germany’s Jazzanova bring the funk and soul on their latest album Funkhaus Studio Sessions out now on Sonar Kollektiv. The Jazzanova producers, Stefan Leisering & Axel Reinemer, took their seven-piece band into the studio and asked Paul Randolph to provide the vocals. The result is an album full of deep grooves.

by Jane Jansen Seymour

25 Jun 2012


Matt and Kim just released a single off their upcoming album, Lightning. It’s called “Let’s Go”, and in typical M&K style, it boasts an uptempo rollin’ beat with Matt’s cooing introduction providing an underpinning for his yelping-with-a-smile vocals, plus a whacking drum solo by Kim. When PopMatters covered their headlining concert at Terminal 5 a year ago, even their first song began with a blast of frenetic energy. So, it’s with mixed feelings that fans experience the video, which has Matt and Kim sitting on the bleachers watching their friend Pat the Roc putting some streetball moves on a basketball court. (They met him during the 2011 Converse Band of Ballers when Matt and Kim were team captains—their team won the championship!)

by Sachyn Mital

25 Jun 2012


by Steven Spoerl

25 Jun 2012


There was already something darkly foreboding and mysterious about Man Without Country‘s recent excellent single, “Closet Addicts Anonymous”, but Van Rivers focuses more on the latter than the former of those two by stripping it down to a Gorillaz-esque pop dirge that manages to have bounce to spare. It’s a strange angle yet it works wonderfully with the context of the song itself, accentuating the light/dark dichotomy that the original only hinted at, choosing to emphasize the dark and bury the light.

In “Closet Addicts Anonymous” there’s an odd sort of resigned acceptance that things aren’t that great but the track manages to stay away from being completely defeatist. This is what the remix expertly hones in on and exploits. It’s a thrilling transition from an intensely aggressive piece to something that barely resembles its former self yet retains part of what made the song so great to begin with, which is exactly what a great remix should do.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Best of the Moving Pixels Podcast: Further Explorations of the Zero

// Moving Pixels

"We continue our discussion of the early episodes of Kentucky Route Zero by focusing on its third act.

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