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by Crispin Kott

14 Jan 2011

Trish Keenan, R.I.P.

The news yesterday that neo-psychedelic chanteuse Trish Keenan, founding member of Broadcast, had been hospitalized for pneumonia was troubling, but it might not have seemed nearly serious enough. According to a press release from Warp Records, Keenan died in the hospital on Friday morning.

It is with great sadness we announce that Trish Keenan from Broadcast passed away at 9am this morning in hospital. She died from complications with pneumonia after battling the illness for two weeks in intensive care.

Our thoughts go out to James, Martin, her friends and her family and we request that the public respect their wishes for privacy at this time.

This is an untimely tragic loss and we will miss Trish dearly—a unique voice, an extraordinary talent and a beautiful human being. Rest in Peace. - Warp Records

by J.C. Sciaccotta

14 Jan 2011

This charmingly goofy video featuring two lionesses and a tigress (the giveaway? See 1:50 in the video…) getting their groove on to Ratatat’s “Wildcat” has racked up almost 900,000 hits on YouTube. Not too bad considering it was made as a throwaway video project for a summer Computer Arts Media class. Shot and edited over a weekend with little more than a handycam and a 20 minute tutorial in Final Cut Pro, the filmmaker wisely embraced her no-budget aesthetic, coupling crude video effects with the feline hijinks. Highlight: the choreographed dance sequence during the breakdown. As Ratatat would say, classic.

by Jane Jansen Seymour

13 Jan 2011

For those not familiar with the Daytrotter website, it’s a gold mine of live sessions created for fan consumption. Their mandate of minimal production during the recording process offers listeners an especially intimate look at bands, plus most sessions are available as free downloads. No overdubs or other enhancements filter the experience – everything is captured on analog tape just as it happened that day. The songs are stripped bare and therefore wonderfully raw. 

Daytrotter posted a MGMT session on January 3rd, this year’s first signature offering. It was recorded not at the Rock Island, Illinois headquarters, but during Moogfest at Echo Mountain in North Carolina last October. Listening to MGMT’s complex arrangements explained why the group looked like they were concentrating so hard up on stage at the Asheville Civic Center when PopMatters caught their performance at the festival. The band kicks off with “Song for Dan Treacy”, full of meandering musical parts that are glossed over on last year’s release, Congratulations. “It’s Working” showcases a driving beat which seems to carry the band along happily in its wake. “I Found a Whistle” utilizes a more upbeat tempo than the studio version and swings with new energy. The closer, “Only a Shadow” is an obscure cover by the ‘80s band the Cleaners from Venus, a fun highlight on the band’s latest tour.

[Daytrotter Session]

by Jon Chapple

13 Jan 2011

Strikingly original, and catchy to the point of irritation, “Maggie’s Last Party” is a curious post-rave oddity thrust onto a dazed Britain nursing a serious comedown in early 1991.

A fusion of then-Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher’s uncompromising speeches with a slowly-evolving post-acid house backing, something in unknowns V.I.M.‘s first crack at club stardom is proving irresistibly addictive, even to these dad rock-hardened ears.

But what’s it all about? A blatant party political broadcast or gentle, poking satire? Proto-Guido Fawkes-esque marrying of Thatcherism with the spirit of the Second Summer of Love, or clever critique of the incumbent government’s tough line on illegal raves? A fond farewell to the departing Iron PM, or a hearty “good riddance”?

Personally, my money’s on the latter—rightist politics and popular music are rarely comfortable bed-fellows—although with lines like “I’m not prepared to restrict our legitimate freedom to party” and “everyone can see / and everybody knows / that this party is best”, your guess is as good as mine. To be honest, I don’t really care.

So then, a challenge: listen to this, say, three or four times one morning, and try to not keep blurting out “the bass goes on” and “acid party!” at inappropriate intervals throughout the day. You don’t win anything. But betcha can’t do it. And if you do, you’re a better man than I am (Gunga Din).

All together now: Rave, rave, rave, murder… Acid party!

by Stephen Rowland

13 Jan 2011

And don’t get that confused with the Mary Jane Girls’ “In My House”.

The video, re-creating a low-budget dance party/music program from what could be the late 1980s or the early 1990s, is complete with glitchy video (NOT film), an introduction from the “host”, cringe-worthy fashions of the era, and even a commercial break with hilarious, faux-local advertisements.

Think what you may about the song, but you gotta see this embarassingly perfect video!

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

READ the article