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by PopMatters Staff

31 Oct 2012


Norway’s Rebekka Karijord releases a video for the exhuisitely beautiful song “Oh Brother” from her ‘We Become Ourselves’ LP. The instrumentation is spare and haunting framed by simple piano motifs and the tune builds intensity with the addition of a small male chorus late in the song. Also, check out another of her recent singles, “Use My Body While It’s Still Young”.

by PopMatters Staff

30 Oct 2012


Denmark’s Black Light White Light play a brand of psych rock influenced by the genre’s ‘60s pioneers, but bring a darker Scandinavian feel into the mix. The band’s debut Infrared Daylight released last year and 2012 has seen the group touring Europe in support of the record and releasing new videos, like this one we premiere today, “The New Line”. The video was shot in 3D by visual artist Sif Mikkelsen, so dig out those glasses for maximum enjoyment. Still, you can catch the psychedelic flavours in 2D if those specs are nowhere to be found. We’ll let Black Light White Light describe the song in their own words:

“‘The New Line’ is about a desperate man’s longing for change and something better in life without knowing what the better actually is and how to make a change. Life has become a deafening sound—an ongoing struggle of power between darkness and light, dream and reality within the body and soul—a duality in lifewhich so well portrayed in the video. Will the new line actually make a change? And if so, what kind of change? You need to take a look in the mirror and be sure to get moving.”—Martin Ejlertsen (Black Light White Light)

by PopMatters Staff

29 Oct 2012


by PopMatters Staff

29 Oct 2012


The UK is always a reliable source for dance rock. That stream turned into a river around the time of Madchester with the likes of Happy Mondays and continues right down to this day. Fridge Magnets are an up-and-coming Scottish band that NME Radar touted as “Scotland’s buzziest/drunkest band”, which sounds about right since this tune is a clear club banger.

by Steven Aoun

29 Oct 2012


Sonnymoon defy easy listening and categorgisation: they understand that pigeon holes are for pigeons. They’re not interested in finding a nesting space, but transcending boundaries. And listeners might be the ones ending up cooing. As the Guardian recently observed in anticipation of their new album (self titled):

Sonnymoon’s music is woozy, magical, mysterious, hypnotic, quixotic. Other words that occurred while we were listening to their self-titled album, released this autumn, included: squelchy, fantastic, phantasmic, plasmic, plastic, spasmic, orgasmic. It is liquid and loose, unconventional and unorthodox. It jerks and juts out at ridiculous angles, but it can also be smooth and easy on the ear. At various points it will seem as though you are listening to an electronica record, at other times to an R&B one, a jazz one, an avant-garde one, even a pop one. Some of the songs will sound like all of the above, at once, while others will make you wonder whether you are listening to a brand new, as yet unnamed genre.

Since no single track can do them justice, we’ve decided to provide an overview.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

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