Latest Blog Posts

by Donal Mosher

28 Apr 2010


The recent collaboration between ARP (Alexis Georgeopolis—a musician, sound based artist and founding member of Tussle) and Anthony Moore ( a composer, media artists and professor of sound theory) is latest release in the Rvng Prsnts Frkwys series that brings artists together with their predecessors “by way of remix, reinterpretation, and collaboration” as stated in their press release. Given the intellectual nature of both artists and this approach the reworking and pairing of Moore’s original work with that ARP yields a deceptively organic recording. Employing strings, drones, loops, references to Arthur Russel and Robert Wyatt, even a vocal track that evokes ‘60s gauzy, romantic crooning, these gentle pieces alternate between contented nostalgia, melancholy, and a subtly hymn like spirit. The strongest tracks blend a pastoral and mathematical minimalism that has the stark, but wholesome, sunlit feel of Shaker design and artwork. This is the kind of open musical creation that attaches itself a quiet, cinematic ease to the environments in which it is played. In fact, ARP and Moore recently performed their work as a soundtrack for David Larcher’s film “MARE’S TAIL” at the Wordless Music Series in Brooklyn. The finest quality Vol. 3 may be that through conceptual basis and contemporary technique, the result is the simple warm pleasure of having tracks like “Wild Grass (for Arthur Russel” or “Today’s Psalter” filling up a bright room on sunny afternoon.

by Alex Suskind

28 Apr 2010


Flying Lotus
Cosmogramma
(Warp)
Releasing: 4 May

Classifying Flying Lotus into any particular genre or sound is almost impossible. Hailing from Winnetka, California the DJ/producer has made a name on, what can be best described as “experimental hip-hop beats”. However, elements of funk, rock, R&B and soul also creep into these sonic landscapes where he mixes thick synthesizers with sound effects best suited for the farthest reaches of outer space. His new album, Cosmogramma, features guest appearances from Radiohead frontman Thom Yorke and jazz great Ravi Coltrane. It’s currently streaming over on Flying Lotus’ MySpace.

01 Clock Catcher
02 Pickled!
03 Nose Art
04 Intro/A Cosmic Drama
05 Zodiac Shit
06 Computer Face/Pure Being
07 …And the World Laughs With You [ft. Thom Yorke]
08 Arkestry
09 Mmmhmm [ft.Thundercat]
10 Do the Astral Plane
11 Satelllliiiiiteee
12 German Haircut
13 Recoiled
14 Dance of the Pseudo Nymph
15 Drips/Auntie’s Harp
16 Table Tennis [ft. Laura Darlington]
17 Galaxy in Janaki

by Sarah Zupko

27 Apr 2010


OK, you already know how much we love Gogol Bordello from Steve Leftridge’s review earlier today. Last night, Eugene Hütz and gang played the Jimmy Fallon show with yet another high-energy (are they ever not this way?) version of “Pala Tute”.

Leftridge described the band better than I’ve ever read: “It’s an eclectic, high-voltage ensemble, but it’s impossible to take your eyes off Ukrainian-born Hütz, the wild, shirtless, mustachioed ball of sweaty charisma who arrived in the US in 1991. Hütz’s strangled voice spits out garbled English as he prowls the stage, assaults his acoustic guitar, leans menacingly over the audience, spins in circles on one foot, and bangs on fire buckets. Violinist Ryabtzev is the Kenickie to Hütz’s Danny Zuko. He’s an elegant mover, all silver beard and jaunty beret and tasteful footwear, and his streaking violin runs provide the rocket fuel in these songs’ arrangements. Fiddler on the Roof? With this band’s mind-bending spectacle, it’s more like Fiddler on the Acid. Indeed, a GB show is part concert, part manic cabaret—a wild blend of Les Miserables, Bad Brains, Stomp!, and the craziest Russian wedding ever.”

by Alistair Dickinson

27 Apr 2010



The always politically-outspoken M.I.A. has apparently decided to join Copper Cab and South Park by wading into the choppy waters of the “gingers” debate. Her extremely NSFW, nine-minute video for new track “Born Free” is directed by Romain Gavras and follows a group of red-headed folks as they get rounded up and forced to endure some pretty awful things by a gang of black-attired goons.

by Crispin Kott

26 Apr 2010


On April 26, 1980, Los Angeles punk band X released their debut. Named after the city which spawned them, the album was a definitive release which not only put the Los Angeles punk scene on the map, but also inspired countless other young bands to look beyond the standard aggro punk idiom.

Los Angeles was produced by Ray Manzarek, who not only contributed keyboards to some of its songs, but also made sure to throw in a tune by his old band, the Doors (“Soul Kitchen”) for good measure.

John Doe and Exene Cervenka were the acknowledged leaders of the group, writing the album’s eight original numbers and sharing vocal duties, but guitarist Billy Zoom and drummer D.J. Bonebrake were every bit as crucial to the band’s early sound.

If it’s not actually possible to hop into a time machine and relive the thrill of the early Los Angeles punk scene, perhaps this clip of “Los Angeles” from X: The Unheard Music will evoke some of its spirit.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

A Chat with José González at Newport Folk Festival

// Notes from the Road

"José González's sets during Newport Folk Festival weren't on his birthday (that is today) but each looked to be a special intimate performance.

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