Latest Blog Posts

by Joseph Fisher

31 Jan 2013


While you’re waiting to hear that new My Bloody Valentine record that never came out two or three days ago, you can check out Rachel Zeffira’s orchestrated cover of MBV’s “To Here Knows When”.

by Brice Ezell

30 Jan 2013


With Frank Ocean and The Weeknd dominating R&B in a huge way in 2012, expectations are high for any artist attempting to step up to the mic that’s shared with artists as immensely talented as those two. It won’t be long, however, before Arthur Ashin—the man behind the Autre Ne Veut moniker—rises successfully to this challenge with the release of his sophomore album Anxiety, out on February 26th for the Mexican Summer label. The record—an almost impossibly rich and multilayered work of avant-pop and R&B—makes one even question if the term “sophomore slump” has any relevance; Anxiety is such a considerable improvement over his 2010 self-titled debut that at times it’s hard to believe it’s the same artist performing.

by Thomas Britt

29 Jan 2013


Though the past decade saw black metal enter into the mainstream, most media discussions of its roots and effects remain shallow. The present debate about a correlation between media violence and real-world violence provides a natural opportunity to examine this popular form. Having premiered at the just-wrapped 2013 Sundance Film Festival, Kat Candler’s short film Black Metal arrives right on time. In less than 10 minutes, the film provokes more serious thought on its subject than Until the Light Takes Us or other similarly uncritical/self-satisfied analyses of recent years.

by Zach Schonfeld

29 Jan 2013


When I first noticed that something professing to be R.E.M.‘s “Losing My Religion” in a major key was making the rounds on the Internet, I assumed it was some sort of joke at the expense of “Shiny Happy People”. Not so. In fact, it’s a digitally reworked recording of the iconic song by a Vimeo account called Major Scaled, which has given similar treatment to songs by Metallica, the Doors, and a few others. If you’ve heard the original song, it sounds—well, weird, upbeat, and more than a little off. You don’t have to be a music theory expert to spot the difference. And if you haven’t heard the original song? I’m not sure there’s anyone alive who can share that perspective.

by Imran Khan

28 Jan 2013


Annette Peacock was an anomaly to begin with. From the start of her career, the artist took a conceptualized approach to her music so extreme she was left marginalized on the outskirts of an otherwise thriving musical culture. It wasn’t such a bad place to be as Peacock often took stock from an observational distance, pulling from the necessary influences of popular music that would help to ground her in the public’s conscience and, yet, still allow her to indulge in the more personal explorations of her multi-layered art. One of the very first artists to experiment with the Moog, a groundbreaking piece of technology that helped to give birth to electronic music, the artist created soundscapes that were unheard of. True to her name, Peacock was an odd bird.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Supernatural Sets the Stage for Season Finalé With “There's Something About Mary”

// Channel Surfing

"A busy episode in which at least one character dies, two become puppets, and three are trapped and left for dead in an unlikely place.

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