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by Alex Suskind

22 Jun 2010


Since 1970, the Glastonbury Festival for Contemporary Performing Arts in England has been a staple for music festivals all over the world. It began 40 years ago (although this isn’t the 40th time the festival has taken place. There have been several years where Glastonbury did not happen), when Marc Bolan, Keith Christmas, Stackridge, Al Stewart and Quintessence played for 1,500 music fans on a farm in Pilton, UK. Back then, the price for admission was £1 including free milk from the farm.

A lot has changed in the past four decades. Glastonbury is now regularly attended by more than 100,000 people each year and tickets run well over £200. This year’s event is being headlined by Gorillaz, Muse and Stevie Wonder.

In honor of the 2010 Glastonbury Festival, which takes place from 24th June - 27th June, we take a look at back at some of the most memorable performances in the festival’s history after the jump…

by Alex Suskind

22 Jun 2010


For almost five decades, Herbie Hancock has provided listeners with a wide variety of traditional and experimental jazz records. With 46 studio albums, 12 Grammy Awards (including the award for Best Album for 2008’s River: The Joni Letters) and one Oscar under his belt, there is very little the iconic pianist and composer has left to accomplish.

Therefore, it is always interesting to see what route Hancock plans on taking with each project. Since his 1962 debut, Takin’ Off, he has written and recorded everything from jazz standards to electronic and hip-hop based instrumentals.

For his newest record, The Imagine Project, Hancock decided to go a route similar to that of his last two albums. For 2005’s Possibilities, he recruited John Mayer, Carlos Santana, Paul Simon and Trey Anastasio, among others, to cover a range of popular R&B and rock hits. In 2008, he invited singers like Leonard Cohen, Tina Turner and Norah Jones to cover songs by singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell on River: The Joni Letters.

On 22 June, Hancock’s Imagine sees him collaborating with more contemporary artists, including John Legend, Pink and Dave Matthews. On the record’s opening track, a cover of John Lennon’s Imagine, Pink, India.Arie, Jeff Beck and Seal join Hancock for a jazzed up version of the 1971 tune. Matthews shows up later to help out on another Lennon-penned tune, 1966’s “Tomorrow Never Knows”, off the Beatles’ Revolver.

The album is currently streaming on NPR.

by Jessy Krupa

18 Jun 2010


Paul McCartney was born on this date in 1942, so today we can celebrate 68 years of singer, musician, songwriter, actor, artist, and author, Paul McCartney. To be honest, he didn’t start composing hits on the day he was born, though, if anyone could, it would be him. Technically, the earliest the larger world knows of him dates back to 1961, when he was just a back-up musician for little-known singer Tony Sheridan.

by John Garratt

17 Jun 2010


Bill Dixon, jazz trumpeter, composer, and educator, died in his Vermont home on Wednesday, June 16. He was 84.

For about half a century, Dixon’s name has been peppered all around the fringes of modern jazz. His works with Archie Shepp and Cecil Taylor in the 1960s placed him on the map, and all over that map he would eventually sprawl himself. He utilized his composition skills as a bandleader and exercised his chops as an occasional sideman. But Dixon was almost always fostering the very genre he was helping to create. He was a professor of music at Bennington College, helped set up appropriate live music venues in Greenwich Village, and organized the October Revolution in jazz concert series. Even though he retired from teaching in the mid-‘90s, he still stayed active with recording and gigging. He even lent a hand to his genre protégé Rob Mazurek on Bill Dixon with Exploding Star Orchestra, which received a positive review from PopMatters, no less.

Before Bill Dixon left us, he created a strange, nebulous double album called Tapestries for Small Orchestra. Eight musicians, including the aforementioned Mazurek, bring to life the deep, impressionistic harmonies that Dixon seemingly plucked from the air and transposed to paper. As “Adagio - Slow Mauve Scribblings” slowly burns down like a stick of incense, you sadly realize that this type of album is almost peerless nowadays, earning it a place in destination-out.com’s favorites of 2009.

The trumpet just lost its Anthony Braxton.

by PopMatters Staff

17 Jun 2010


Mr Mashup, Pogo, celebrates the release this week of Toy Story 3 (yes, it’s another summer of sequels) with “Toyz Noize”. Read more in depth about Pogo in L.B. Jeffries’ recent Moving Pixels article, “Pogo: Turning Classic Films into New Songs”.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Country Fried Rock: Drivin' N' Cryin' to Be Inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame

// Sound Affects

""If Drivin' N' Cryin' sounded as good in the '80s as we do now, we could have been as big as Cinderella." -- Kevn Kinney

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