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by Allison Taich

5 Jan 2010


The Flaming Lips recently collaborated with relative Okies Stardeath and White Dwarfs to recreate Pink Floyd’s legendary The Dark Side of the Moon. Featured on several tracks is Henry Rollins, along with songstress Peaches, who takes the lead vocals on “The Great Gig in the Sky”. While it’s not a direct replica of the 1973 masterpiece, it is a thrilling reinterpretation with ample Flaming Lips color and flavor. The album was released exclusively to iTunes on 22 December 2009.

by Tyler Gould

4 Jan 2010


That crazed devil-on-a-rollercoaster look that John Darnielle gets on his face when his songs get going is more than enough to calm (or amplify, I suppose) a Mountain Goats’ fan’s anxieties about the next twelve months. He stopped by NPR recently to perform some old hits (“Color in Your Cheeks”, “Going to Georgia”) and two from last year’s wonderful The Life of the World to Come.

by Tyler Gould

4 Jan 2010


Deakin had nothing to do with Animal Collective’s Merriwether Post Pavilion, but lest you think he’s been resting on his laurels for forever and a day, he’s started the new year by conventionally spelling his stage name and putting out some solo material.

Untitled [MP3]
     

by Sean Murphy

4 Jan 2010


1959 remains, arguably, the most important year in the history of jazz music. Among all-time classic efforts from Miles Davis, John Coltrane and Ornette Coleman, Charles Mingus released his masterpiece, Mingus Ah Um. To commemorate the fiftieth anniversary of this seminal session, we were blessed with Mingus Ah Um: Legacy Edition (which includes a remaster of the original, along with bonus tracks and the entirety of the other album Mingus cut for Columbia in 1959, Mingus Dynasty). 1959 signified the year that Mingus, after considerable dues paying, fully matured as a musician and composer. Mingus Ah Um is a virtual encyclopedia of the jazz music made at that point in the 20th century, which means it celebrates the sounds and feelings of America. This is the one Mingus release that has a little bit of everything, from ebullient statements of purpose (“Better Git It in Your Soul”) to soulful tributes (“Goodbye Pork Pie Hat”, “Jelly Roll”) to Mingus’s inimitable sociopolitical smackdowns (“Fables of Faubus”). This reissue is at once an essential reminder for fans and an imperative introduction for novices; it is the ultimate testament to the miracle that was Charles Mingus, one of the immortal voices in American music.

by John Bergstrom

4 Jan 2010


For the past decade, Swervedriver seemed destined to be one of the Bands That History Left Behind. The hard-hitting, melodic, often thrilling music the band produced in the early-to-mid 1990s would forever be lost in a wash of bad record deals and bad timing. Anyway, what to make of a British band that sang about Ford Mustangs? Swervedriver were pigeonholed into the short-lived UK “shoegazer” scene because they had an indifferent image and made music that was as pretty as it was loud. Here, though, was driving music that was neither as obtuse as metal nor as bleak as Nirvana. 1991 debut “Raise was a strong enough feet-finding effort built around a trio of outstanding singles. 1993 follow-up, Mezcal Head, however, was a bona-fide masterpiece, with a devastating combination of great tunes, great playing, and great production. Thankfully, these thoughtful, rich-sounding reissues gave fans and curious music lovers in general a chance to catch up with a band that shouldn’t have been left behind in the first place.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

A Crooked and Unseen Highway: lowercase - "She Takes Me"

// Sound Affects

"The newest Between the Grooves series tackles Lowercase's Kill the Lights, a great marriage of slowcore and post-punk: raw, angry, sullen, and very much alive almost 20 years later.

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