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Wednesday, Nov 19, 2014
Sinoia Caves (Black Mountain's Jeremy Schmidt) did the iconic score for 2010's Beyond the Black Rainbow, the demand for it leading to a 2014 release for the first time. Now, Schmidt walks us through his Fave Five Film Scores, and it is a trip in and of itself.

Isn’t it kind of great when your day job (playing in a celebrated modern psych-rock outfit known as Black Mountain) and your favorite hobby (making film scores) eventually merge to become the same thing?


You see, back in 2010, Jeremy Schmidt—best known as Black Mountain’s highly-regarded synth player—flexed his muscles under his Sinoia Caves moniker to create the brooding, throbbing, psychedelic-yet-intensely-dark score for Panos Cosmatos’ 2010 feature Beyond the Black Rainbow. The visually intense homage to ‘80s horror/sci-fi never got much in terms of a major release, but as the years have gone by, its reputation as a DVD cult favorite has grown and grown. The score, it turned out, proved to be a major part of it, and even with Black Mountain cheekily subtitling their Year Zero best-of compilation “Original Soundtrack By”, it’s the demand for Schmidt’s work as Sinoia Caves which has grown and grown, up to the point where his longtime record label, Jagjaguwar, finally put out his epic score for BtBR in Fall of 2014.


To celebrate this event, much less one of those magnificent occasions where a score can completely stand on its own even for people who haven’t seen the film, PopMatters asked Schmidt to name his “Fave Five” film scores. It was a fascinating insight into Schmidt’s cinematic influences, but, does so also with a qualifier:


“It’s hard to narrow down such a broad category into ‘five faves’ without at least a few glaring omissions, ie; Aguirre, Wrath of God, Suspiria, Zabriskie Point, and no John Carpenter—because I couldn’t pick one!  So this, as a result, is far from being any kind of comprehensive list. I decided to stick with those film scores that, at least to a larger extent, harken back to a certain “golden age” of the analogue synthesizer—which heavily invaded the soundtrack vernacular of the late 70s and early 80s. Listed here in no particular order ...”


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Wednesday, Nov 19, 2014
Four British MCs work a dark hip-hop groove in an exchange of words edged with the grit of London streets.

Bare-boned and elegantly dark, “The Cypher” unravels with economy and style the turntablist aestheticisms of old-school hip-hop. Four of the UK’s hardest-working indie rappers trade rhyme and verse atop a ringing horn sample, exploring all dimensions of flow. Unapologetically British and defiantly proud of it, Yung Truth, D.A., Hoodzee, and L. Salv exercise a tension noirishly filmic and wickedly grand. Nowhere near a big-budget production, it’s a small-time effort that captures a certain energy brewing in the circles of the UK’s underground hip-hop scenes.


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Wednesday, Nov 19, 2014
Devin Sinha offers up the newest video from his latest studio outing, The Seventh Season, for the tune rockish folk of "Lone Elm Road".

Seattle by way of Kansas City singer/songwriter Devin Sinha just dropped his newest LP, The Seventh Season. Of the many tunes that exemplify his rock and pop-tinged folk style on the album, “Lone Elm Road” stands out in particular. Sinha filmed a video for the track, which can be viewed below.


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Tuesday, Nov 18, 2014
With some ace bluegrass flatpicking and tender vocal harmonies, the Gibson Brothers' take on the Everly Brothers classic "Bye Bye Love" shows this reputable bluegrass group in fine form.

Eric and Leigh Gibson, the two men heading up the Gibson Brothers name, are elder statesmen of bluegrass, having been active in the scene since the late ‘80s. When the duo topped PopMatters’ Best Bluegrass of 2011 list, Steve Leftridge wrote, “Eric and Leigh Gibson might have, pound-for-pound, the most impeccably fine-sounding traditional bluegrass band on the contemporary scene.” Not content to rest on their clearly established laurels, the brothers Gibson have taken on the mantle of covering the songs of music’s most legendary brother duos for their forthcoming album Brotherhood. The album features finds the brothers taking on two well known tunes and nine other tracks that have never been available to the public before.


“Bye Bye Love” stands out as particularly apt for Eric and Leigh to cover. You need only stream the track below to see how comfortably this duo slips into the sound of one of folk music’s most legendary duos.


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Tuesday, Nov 18, 2014
Members of Detroit garage rock icons Von Bondies release their debut video, "Folks", under the new moniker PONYSHOW.

Coming out of the Detroit scene, the Von Bondies were one of the aughts’ premier garage rock groups. PONYSHOW is a mix between its progeny and its reincarnated avatar. Formed in the spring of 2014 in Ferndale, Michigan, the trio is composed of Von Bondies alumni Jason Stollsteimer, Leann Banks, and Donny Blum. The group released its first 7” in October, and now have their debut music video to go along with it, in the form of the kinetic rouser “Folks”.


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