Latest Blog Posts

by Jessy Krupa

14 Feb 2013


It’s that time of year again. Heart shapes decorate every window while our sympathetic friends point out that we will surely have a date next year. You can’t even turn the radio on without some DJ advising you it isn’t too late to order flowers, teddy bears, or chocolate-covered everythings!

For some, this holiday is a romantic occasion in which they and a special someone exchange sweet little mementos of their love. To others, Valentine’s Day is an annoying, depressing drag that makes you want to stay in bed with the covers pulled up over your head for the next 24 hours. Yes, single people loathe Valentine’s Day, but at least we can funnel that hatred into creating awesomely twisted mixtapes.

by PopMatters Staff

14 Feb 2013


My Panda Shall Fly

by Imran Khan

13 Feb 2013


Hannah Marcus’ sorely underrated album, Desert Farmers, yielded a spectacular number called “Hairdresser in Taos”, a nightmarish tune that majestically unfurls to reveal a harsh soundscape of bitter blues and scorched jazz. In the artful mess is a surreal and hallucinatory tale of a drug-addict and his jaded, disillusioned girlfriend setting out across the deserts of New Mexico. Along the way the drug-addict is dropped off and the girlfriend tails a mysterious hairdresser back to his house where she is given a dye-job. At this point, the song takes an eerie, almost sinister turn and Marcus’ unsettling recount that he “stuck my head in the sink and he put red dye all over my hair / and when I sat up it ran into my eyes and I looked in the mirror and I started to cry” is enough to turn the vertebrae to ice. From the moment she flees the house, the panic in the song peaks to a feverish pitch and the sprawling, atmospheric beauty of her nine-minute opus truly blossoms into the masterful study on modern Americana that it is. You don’t just hear this sort of music, you experience it.

by Brice Ezell

12 Feb 2013


Steven Wilson remains as prolific as ever. Following in the style of the video for “Drag Ropes”, the lead track off of 2012’s much-hyped collaboration Storm Corrosion which featured Wilson working in tandem with Opeth frontman Mikael Akerfeldt, the British prog legend has released the first video from his third solo LP, The Raven that Refused to Sing (and other stories). The album—out on February 26th in the US—is undoubtedly the most progressive thing Wilson has released in his illustrious career; while he’s never hidden the influence of King Crimson, Yes, and Pink Floyd on his music, on The Raven he lets his inner jam musician go absolutely nuts. Three out of the LP’s six tracks run over ten minutes, with enough time signature changes, mellotron, and atypical chord patterns to keep even the most demanding prog fans happy.

by Imran Khan

12 Feb 2013


Vardar’s first musical outing, a 2008 underground album entitled Piyasanın adamıyım, Piyasaya karşıyım, didn’t generate the kind of response he had hoped for, but it did help him to cut his teeth on the mechanisms of putting an album together.  In between composing radio jingles and music for short films, the rapper would take time to regroup and rethink his approach for the far more mature, daring and brazen work that would become Kötü Adam, his first proper commercial debut. Enlisting in the help of some key collaborators (Sinan Ceceli, Serkan Hökenek, Cüneyt Tatlıcı, respectively), Vardar would create a combustible blend of hip-hop and electronica that would melt speakers and rattle ribcages in Lamborghinis and nightclubs all over Turkey. Encompassing both the jetsetter cool reflected in the smooth, diamond-cut beats and the swagger and slang of an urban ghetto, Kötü Adam finds a musical counterpoint of shine and grime. Silver-tongued and sharp-witted rhymes are meted out with force as the rapper covers topics of love, hate, sex and violence in a city of cultural upheaval and harmony.

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