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J. Tillman‘s video for “Though I Have Wronged You” is barely a video, consisting only of a low-res conversation between green and pink pixel clusters. What do they talk about? The usual: feeling disconnected when we’re technologically connected to more of the world than ever before, the difficulty of living from within as opposed to building a persona out of tweets and status updates, the way the Internet feeds narcissism by allowing us to submit parts of ourselves for judgment by our peers so we can then judge for ourselves whether or not we like the reaction to the self that we’ve put out into the world, the modern desire for ultimate power over ourselves and others through calculation, mediation, modulation. The conversation is is engaging enough to detract from the song itself, making them two disparate conversations cruelly sharing the same .flv file, which suits the mood about right.

Here’s a video for the title track from Cocker’s Further Complications, slinky stage presence and paper airplane transitions included.

The Roots joined Jim James, Conor Oberst, M. Ward, and Mike Mogis on stage Wednesday night to kick out the jams, as they say. The debut album from Monsters of Folk is out now on Rough Trade.

Here’s Thao sitting in some lucky person’s living room and playing the title track from her latest for Yours Truly, which I wish were me and not a website called Yours Truly. Not that I’m not truly yours, dear reader.

Ash doesn’t make albums anymore. Instead, they put out singles with videos like this one. On the one hand, you would think that if they’d given up the album process entirely they might put a little effort into this, the visual representation of their music. But then again, the kind of people who completely disregard indebtedness to the album format probably are not that keen arbitrarily accoutring their music at all!

//Blogs

The Best and Worst Films of Spring 2015

// Short Ends and Leader

"January through April is a time typically made up of award season leftovers, pre-summer spectacle, and more than a few throwaways. Here are PopMatters' choices for the best and worst of the last four months.

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