Latest Blog Posts

by John Bergstrom

5 Oct 2010

Here’s a link to the rather charming video for Crowded House’s “Either Side of the World”, from this year’s Intriguer album. Hope all that footage was cleared, guys!

[Watch video]

by Joseph Fisher

4 Oct 2010

Somewhere in my fingers is a longer post about how Glee has gone completely off the rails, but I need a few days to compose it properly. For now, I just want to open with a question. It goes a little something like this:

If we follow the logic of this season’s “Britney/Brittany” episode (episode 2), Ms. Spears is threatening because her unbridled sexuality can cause students to break out into a massive “sex riot”. However, Madonna, from the first season’s “The Power of Madonna” show (episode 15), still stands as an icon of empowerment and self-expression. How, then, do the writers explain the live song and dance performance in the clip below?

Do we really need to tell the writers of this show that quite clearly takes place in an American high school that they need to do their homework? 

Okay, that’s two questions. Maybe I should work on my math. Discuss below.

by Jane Jansen Seymour

4 Oct 2010

Avi Buffalo is a young buzz band making waves from Long Beach, California, which has caught the attention of many: I wrote about them earlier for this blog here. They played to critical acclaim at SXSW, opened for Modest Mouse this summer and are now heading out on their own headline tour across North America. They visited the studios of KCRW on September 21st, clearly thrilled to be among the bands performing for live there as they quickly admitted to listening and watching to many of the sessions themselves. They started with a laid back version their hit, “What’s It in For?” This was the fist song I heard from the group when it was back in heavy rotation on KCRW’s “Morning Becomes Eclectic” early this year. Things ended in a soft funky jam, which flowed right into the next song with a seasoned approach of a band clearly aware of its abilities.

The interview brought out some of the teenage awkwardness under the spotlight, as they explained the band sometimes has to escorted into a club just to play because they’re underaged. Avi has been playing guitar for seven years and was apparently doodling with his instrument the whole time. He’s the one who writes the music and lyrics before the band jams to “hash things out”. During the session, played by three out of four members of the band, the lyrics stand out a bit more than the layered recordings on their self-titled album, which was certainly nice to experience. They also ran out of time during the live broadcast for my favorite song, “Remember Last Time”, but it’s here in its entirety for eternity.

[Listen to show]

by Sarah Zupko

4 Oct 2010

Photo: Astrid Snoepsnail

The British/Dutch Legendary Pink Dots are veterans of psychedelic rock, plying their trade since 1980. The band has a new album, Seconds Late for the Brighton Line, coming from ROIR tomorrow,  5 October.The Dots also have a lengthy North American tour scheduled (dates below the jump) to promote the new record as well as to celebrate their 30 years of musical expression. New Yorkers can catch the group with the Dresden Dolls at Irving Plaza in NYC on Halloween. Today, we bring you the video premiere of the moody “Hauptbahnhof”, which highlights the dark, Krautrock, classical influence in the Dot’s work.

<a href="">Russian Roulette by Legendary Pink Dots</a>

by Timothy Gabriele

4 Oct 2010

Yes, this is the same Blame (Conrad Shafie) who used to cut insane jungle anthem like “Music Takes You” and “Antemia (with Justice)” on Moving Shadow, now with Tinchy Stryder and company singing over a decidedly nu-trance commercial backdrop as grime continues to seek its place on alongside radio-friendly pop mostly by mimicry. The astronaut in the video, alone at what seems like the end of the world seems a nice, if out of place, post-apocalyptic touch, but the concept is ruined by the arrival of unexpected visitors. Is this trash or not? I can’t decide.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

READ the article