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by Jessy Krupa

30 Aug 2010

In recent years, Rolling Stone has found itself in quite a dilemma. Throughout the ‘60s and ‘70s, they were part of the voice of America’s counterculture, making a mark on music history with their infamous articles, interviews, and photography of the greatest artists of our time. However, the Rolling Stone of today is some sort of mismatched hybrid between Entertainment Weekly, Maxim, and Newsweek. For example, its most recent issue featured in-depth interviews with both Chuck Berry and the WikiLeaks hacker, but the cover glamorized a short, splashy interview with the nude, fake-blood splattered cast of HBO’s True Blood.

Still, despite their love of putting naked people on the cover, the magazine still tries to continue their musical credibility with special editions devoted to things that they were already supposed to writing about. Last month saw the release of the updated “500 Greatest Songs” list, in which for twice the price of a regular issue, you essentially got a great book about the past 60 years of popular music in a fancy magazine format. Unfortunately, that was somewhat spoiled by their publicity-seeking approach of presenting those articles and photography in a holier-than-thou list ranking the songs in order of their greatness. Many people out there shook their heads in disbelief at the notion of Rihanna’s “Umbrella” and M.I.A.’s “Paper Planes” being deemed greater than Elvis Presley’s “Love Me Tender” or the Beatles’ “Penny Lane”.

Now, perhaps in an effort to make up for that misstep or in order to become the talk of the town again, Rolling Stone has put out a special issue entitled “The 100 Greatest Beatles Songs”. “A Day in The Life” is deemed the greatest Beatles song, even though “Hey Jude”, “Yesterday”, “I Want to Hold Your Hand”, “Let It Be”, and “In My Life” all ranked higher than it on the 500 list.

Here are their picks for the top 10 greatest Beatles songs, though, and I’ll accept any excuse, no matter how inconsequential, to listen to and talk about the Beatles.

by PopMatters Staff

27 Aug 2010

Atlanta’s the Biters specialize in the catchy sort of guitar power pop that lit up AM radios in the ‘70s. Think Cheap Trick, the Knack, Big Star and T-Rex. Their infectious, punky tunes are being released through a series of EPs on the band’s own label, Underrated Records. “Melody For Lovers” will appear on an EP releasing next week and there will be yet another EP in the fall. The Biters are also big fans Motown, ‘60s pop and Stiff Records and believe in the power of the perfect three-minute pop single. As such, they have no immediate plans for a full length album and will be staying on the singles path, focusing their energies on nuggets of ear candy.

by John Bergstrom

26 Aug 2010

Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark (OMD) are set to release their first album in 14 years, History of Modern, on September 17 in Europe, September 20 in the UK, and September 28 in North America. In the meantime, here’s the video for the first single, the very OMD-ish “If You Want It”.

by Daniel Tebo

26 Aug 2010

The video for Twin Shadow’s “Slow” is tagged NSFW yet it’s nowhere near as creepy as the legendarily misbegotten Calvin Klein commercials it gently parodies. The Alex Markman-directed clip finds Twin Shadow loverman George Lewis Jr. fidgeting uncomfortably in front of the camera while an unseen interrogator asks Lewis for peek at his big… talents. The full spectrum of those formidable talents will be on display when Twin Shadow drops Forget, their stunner of a debut album, September 28th on Chris Taylor’s (Grizzly Bear) Terrible Records.

by PopMatters Staff

26 Aug 2010

British singer-songwriter Andreya Triana has been hailed by Gilles Peterson and he recently had her on a BBC Radio One program with him. Triana’s debut Lost Where I Belong, produced by none other than Bonobo, releases 7 September on Ninja Tune Records. Here’s a new remix to whet your appetite for the album and her upcoming November North American tour (dates after the jump).

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

READ the article