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by John Garratt

20 Feb 2012


Guitarist Bryan Ward has a very simple website, so it gets right to the point. The first sentence of his short bio tosses out terms like “folktronica” and “acoustic trance”. The second paragraph begins with this audacious claim: “Part tribal reverie, part ecstatic folk, the sound is unlike anything you’ve ever heard.” The unlike-anything-you’ve-ever-heard tag is an oft used but seldom justified marketing phrase that actually applies to Ward’s music. The track “Lost, Lost”, available for free on his website, is a swirling construction of studio alchemy that gets its tribal kicks from hypnotic repetition.

“Lost, Lost” appears on Bryan Ward’s debut album Bone Anthems, which can be purchased here.

by Comfort Clinton

20 Feb 2012


Erika M. Anderson, also known as EMA, is a singer/songwriter originally hailing from South Dakota. She began her musical career in 2006 as part of a Drone Folk band called Gowns, and marks her album debut with the recently released Past Life Martyred Saints. With her brassy vocals and fine tuned guitar plucking, EMA has garnered the praise of critics like Rolling Stone, Time Out New York, Village Voice, and was named one of NRP’s “Favorite New Artists of 2011”.

Anderson’s video for her single “Take One Two” recently debuted on Pitchfork. The video, shot by Anderson and featuring the artist herself, comes in the form of a compilation of footage she took in a trailer park during her teenage years. The video is visually interesting, but also meaningful, given it’s anti-bullying message. EMA said of the footage of she and friends being goofy in the mid ‘90s, “This is especially remarkable as I know what was going on outside those plywood walls: getting called names, shoved into lockers, and threatening to get our asses kicked for being queer or punk or just plain weird. But despite all that, there is a joy, strength and self-acceptance in our faces that I find inspiring and wanted to pass on.” Taking the cause one step further still, EMA has pledged to donate the net proceeds from sales of “Take One Two” to the Jamie Isaacs Foundation for Anti-Bullying.

So, enjoy the soulful vibe of “Take One Two”, set to a snippet of life as a South Dakota teen facing opposition. As EMA said “This one’s for all the weirdos out there: cherish your friends, f—k the haters and let your freak flag fly.”

by Imran Khan

17 Feb 2012


Dizraeli’s excursion into East Indian rhythms gives food for thought in “People Taking Pictures”. The British rapper’s scathing attack on Western tourism explores the concepts of exoticism over a hand-drummed groove and some snatches of Bollywood splendour. His observations make a compelling case for the exploitative damage that a single click of a camera can cause and he isn’t beyond calling himself out on that charge. Dizraeli’s dagger-tipped rhymes are thrown so swiftly, they can leave you unsteady (that is, if they don’t cut you first). But the full-bodies beats and their vigorous rhythms (courtesy of Tom Caruana) should help regain your balance.  Check out the first single from the upcoming White Man (Moves) album.

by Sachyn Mital

17 Feb 2012


At the end of October last year, the camera manufacturer Canon held a launch party for its new printer model, the Pixma Pro-1. While some were psyched to see some of the new 1D-X cameras on display, others were excited for a performance from Herbie Hancock, though the two are not mutually exclusive.

As part of the evening, Hancock’s performance of “Chameleon” was captured, in photograph form, with cameras lent to various attendees (“crowd sourced”) and hung from the ceiling to be spliced together to create a “stop motion” music video (which of course features the printer). The result is interesting to say the least and is presented here for your viewing pleasure.

by John Garratt

16 Feb 2012


Anthony Braxton, prodigal son of the AACM movement and MacArthur grant recipient, has just released his very first recorded opera, Trillium E, in the form of a four-disc box set. He seems to understand the financial, as well as mental, undertaking customers require when encountering works like this, so he has decided to release a free career sampler. Composition, Improvisation, Synthesis: Selections from the Tri-Centric Foundation Archives runs the gamut of his numerous instrumental works (identified only by number) as well as an improvisational piece and excerpt from Trillium E itself. All it will cost you is a little bit of personal information, and all 79-plus minutes of this wonderful, wild music is yours.

An NPR story mentioning both Trillium E and Composition, Improvisation, Synthesis: Selections from the Tri-Centric Foundation Archives can be read or downloaded here.

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