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by Arnold Pan

6 Jun 2010


Superchunk
Majesty Shredding
Merge
Releasing: 14 September

Considering that Superchunk pretty much churned out an album a year during the 1990s, it’s hard to believe that the quintessential power-punk band has basically been on hiatus since 2001’s Here’s to Shutting Up. In some ways, though, it hardly seems like they’ve gone anywhere, since the band’s mainstays Laura Ballance and Mac McCaughan seem ever-present building their label Merge from a respected indie into a cultural phenomenon in the interim. From the looks and sounds of the one-minute video trailer promoting the new album, Majesty Shredding, Superchunk might be headed back to the basics after leaving off with forays into a more mature sound, at least relatively speaking. Hear what could’ve been this summer’s soundtrack in the fall when Majesty Shredding is released on September 14 by—who else?—Merge.

SONG LIST
01 Digging for Something
02 My Gap Feels Weird

03 Rosemarie

04 Crossed Wires

05 Slow Drip

06 Fractures in Plaster

07 Learned to Surf

08 Winter Games

09 Rope Light

10 Hot Tubes

11 Everything at Once

by Benjamin Aspray

4 Jun 2010


Full disclosure: my tolerance for neo-electro, or nü-rave, or whatever the hell you want to call it, began and ended with Justice. A handful of artists who may fall under these umbrella terms are still great—Hot Chip comes immediately to mind—but understand that they’ve remained so via genre dilettantism. The category itself, loosely defined by minimized acid house textures and hyper-compressed, white noise rhythms, is both redeemed and limited by its simplicity. The unanimous gushing over Sleigh Bells’ recent LP suggests that this big ‘n’ dumb thing still holds a lot of appeal for a lot of people, but not for this critic. A recent video from Mr. Flash, a member of the French-tested, Vice-approved Ed Banger label, seems to exemplify this: all T&A, bright lights, and shock value, but little reason to turn on the song on its own.

Color me surprised, then, when a friend tipped me off to Huoratron, and the high-concept film clip for his new single, “Corporate Occult”—and I liked it! Like, I could actually imagine LISTENING to it!  The severe-looking Finnish producer’s trick seems to be going for slight complexities—- an arrhythmic drum sample here, a demonic chipmunk scream there - where his kin may be content to turn up the volume.

The very NSFW video that accompanies it, directed by the undoubtedly talented Cédric Blaisbois (also responsible for the Mr. Flash video linked above) is similarly deceptively trite. What I first dismissed as yet another attempt to outdo Chris Cunningham is… still derivative of that iconic director, but it’s hard not to crack a smile at the outlandish violence. I won’t spoil it, but suffice to say that it plays like a cautionary tale about going home with the kinds of chicks you’re likely to meet at a neo-electro/nü-rave/whatever-the-hell-you-want-to-call-it show.

To close, I’ll leave you with a quote from my friend, on Huoratron’s pseudonym: “Huora means whore by the way. one of emancipative things i have been to has been their gig when the whole audience was shouting ‘huora, huora, huora’ together. It’s like a postmodern church.”

by Alistair Dickinson

3 Jun 2010


Pogo, the Australian producer of “Alice” fame, has returned to YouTube with “Gardyn”. While Pogo famously mashed up tunes and clips from various movies (and made music videos out of equally mashed up scenes from those movies), this time he has decided to build a track completely from scratch. Recorded using sounds captured in his own backyard, the song and video prove that Pogo is more than capable of channeling his distinctive style with elements other than singing Disney characters. It also shows that he lives in a pretty awesome house, and that chopped-up scenes of his mother singing in a garden may be just as trippy as any compendium of scenes from Mary Poppins.

by Maria Schurr

3 Jun 2010


Here is the official video for “Time of the Assassins”, the second single to be released from Charlotte Gainsbourg’s rightfully lauded IRM. Whereas the video for first single “Heaven Can Wait” featured everyday scenes with a surreal twist and the appearance of a sort of known musician named Beck Hansen, “Time of the Assassins” has just a dab of the surreal and a lot of Gainsbourg in scenic locations. Not surprisingly, the result is quite cinematic.

by Sarah Zupko

2 Jun 2010


This Friday, writer/director Nicholas Stoller and producer Judd Apatow brings us Get Him to the Greek, a spin-off of the critically acclaimed comedy Forgetting Sarah Marshall (2008). Russell Brand again plays rock star Aldous Snow, who releases a disastrous song called “African Child” that basically torpedoes his career, until music exec Aaron Green (Jonah Hill) drags him from London to LA for a career-rebooting reunion show. Brand sings his own tunes in the film, rather like Jeff Bridges recently in Crazy Heart. Get Him to the Greek opens this Friday and this brought to mind other examples throughout film history of actors playing musicians for real and singing songs for themselves. These are some of my favorites… share yours in the comments section.

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