Latest Blog Posts

by William Carl Ferleman

3 Sep 2010

I attended a Gin Blossoms show in Kansas City last week. I couldn’t help from thinking about this: How could one name a band Gin Blossoms when only some original members remain part of it? How does one properly define a band or group nowadays? When a critical member (de)parts, does the show still go on? Are simply hits and name recognition enough, not to mention the explicit, blatant bamboozlement of a likely uninformed public? 

Troubled songwriter and guitarist Doug Hopkins unfortunately killed himself in 1993, after the band terminated him; he wrote the band’s major Billboard hits “Hey Jealousy” and “Found Out About You”. Watching singer Robin Wilson sing these songs and cheerfully work the audience, tambourine and all, was a bit unsettling to me; same goes for Hopkins’ “replacement” on guitar, Scott Johnson. But the band does have a new album due later this month.

Here is video from a show in Boston.

by Jennifer Cooke

3 Sep 2010

Julius C is a band, not a guy. Just when you thought unsigned rock acts only played for beer money, studio time or gas for their vans, these four curly-haired hipsters come along and show us they care about more than beard-grooming and ironic T-shirts. September 1 kicked off a 30-shows-in-30-days jaunt all around New York City to benefit Powerhouse, a program for homeless pregnant and parenting teen moms. And when you throw in a video featuring dancing gorillas and a catchy-as-hell power pop tune called “Don’t Want Anybody”, you might even forget that these guys are rocking out for a good cause.

by Jane Jansen Seymour

3 Sep 2010

For the past five years I have created playlists for myself and shared them this friend who suggested I start my blog—NewMusicMatters and now I’m also writing for PopMatters. In this era of pick and choose selections off MySpace, iTunes and such, it’s almost odd that the concept of a playlist has even survived. But there really is something about a self-contained listening session. It’s always good to start off strong with a “don’t you love how music can move you” song, maybe even enough to get up and boogie. From there I like to meander along different moods until some kind of reflective closure wraps up the playlist.

Wasn’t sure whether to call this next group late summer or early fall 2010. I know it’s not technically autumn, but the acorns are dropping and the sun isn’t shining as strong as it was a few weeks ago. It’s all about sharing the love of new music with each selection, plus of course the craft of compilation which is always fun.

by Joseph Fisher

2 Sep 2010

Apparently, it is the week for beer-music hybrid posts here on PopMatters. After pondering the accuracy of styling a beer after hardcore’s teetotaling tendencies, I will now link you to NPR’s discussion of Dogfish Head’s newest (limited) craft brew: Bitches Brew, a beer released to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Miles Davis record of the same name. Regrettably, I have not yet had the opportunity to sample Bitches Brew, but if it is anything like the record, it definitely will be one to savor.

What other beer-music pairings can we develop here? And no, PBR and [x] record doesn’t count as a response.

by Andy Johnson

2 Sep 2010

At the start of August I blogged about the new single from Manic Street Preachers, the bouncy, populist rock of “(It’s Not War) Just the End of Love”. Soon afterwards we learned that the song’s video was to feature Michael Sheen—he of playing-Tony-Blair fame—and fellow thespian Anna Friel. Now that video has emerged and turns out to be a typically oblique entry to the Manics video canon, the two stars playing a chess pros locked into an intense match—adjudicated by the band members—during which they suddenly become very, very friendly. Unhelpfully the video itself can’t be embedded but it can be found here.

//Mixed media

Indie Horror Month 2016: Executing 'The Deed'

// Moving Pixels

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