Latest Blog Posts

by John M. Tryneski

9 Oct 2014


This Monday, Screaming Females premiered their new single, “Wishing Well”, online. The song is wistful and resigned. It’s hard to figure out which sounds more jarring coming from Marissa Paternoster, the low-key meandering guitar lines that open the song or the lyrics where she promises to “be much sweeter”. It’s poppier than anything in the band’s catalog and is an exciting step forward.

by Maria Schurr

6 Oct 2014


The critically lauded Emmaar was released this year, its song “Arhegh Danagh” being an excellent showcase for Tinariwen’s ability to create hypnotic song structures which still retain traces of founder Ibrahim Ag Alhabib’s pop influences.

This month sees Tinariwen embarking on a US tour beginning in Pomona, California for the Moon Block Party Festival and culminating in November with an appearance at the Daniel Lanois-curated event “Anti-thesis” at Brooklyn, New York’s Masonic Temple, a bill that features such quality acts as Lonnie Holley, the Antlers, and Lanois himself. The video for “Arhegh Danagh”, premiering below, should give ticket holders a keen idea of what to expect from Tinariwen’s North American jaunt.

Additionally, an EP entitled Inside / Outside: Joshua Tree Acoustic Sessions, is out today and features five acoustic songs recorded in tandem with Emmaar.

by PopMatters Staff

26 Sep 2014


You can purchase Thom Yorke’s record at tomorrowsmodernboxes.com.

by Brice Ezell

30 May 2014


The title of the Portland, Oregon outfit HERS’ latest LP, Youth Revisited, may at first pass suggest a mood of nostalgia. Such a simplistic take, however, all but dissipates as the first notes of the album begin. This first song, “Bad”, finds frontwoman and songwriter Melissa Amstutz hauntingly repeating, “I’ve been so bad.”

As the much-hyped debut LP by Syracuse’s Perfect Pussy has already demonstrated this year, there’s a real power in unflinching emotional examination. However, in contrast to the cut-and-paste sonic of Say Yes to Love, Youth Revisited‘s musical range is far more refined and wide-spanning.

by PopMatters Staff

19 May 2014


Saul Conrad grew up in a musical family and was trained in classical music from a very early age, receiving formal training for some 20 years. That education informs his super melodic and harmonically complex songs, which feel like mini revelations in the age of cookie cutter top 40 pop music. You know that you’re dealing with a special artist when they reference Kierkegaard as an influence on their music.

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