Latest Blog Posts

by PopMatters Staff

30 Oct 2013

Of Blessed Feathers’ 2012 EP Peaceful Beast in an Ocean of Weeds, PopMatters’ Matthew Fiander wrote that the Wisconsin duo’s “hazy sounds can still be awfully substantial”. That description definitely applies to the group’s new full-length Order of the Arrow, as the ascendant melodies conjured up by Donivan Berube and Jacquelyn Beaupre are anchored by pithy folk structures. There’s an organic feel to the whole affair that comes through in the resonant, rootsy boy-girl vocals and the earthy percussion. Working with Real Estate and Widowspeak producer Kevin McMahon and Sharon Van Etten guitarist Doug Keith on Order of the Arrow, Blessed Feathers’ intimate vibe opens up just enough, covering more ground than you might expect.

by PopMatters Staff

12 Jul 2013

From the label: The record is the self-titled debut from a duo called Pony Bwoy, and is a remarkable collection of R&B-inspired dark-pop rooted in wavy electronics and hyper-rhythmic vocals.

by PopMatters Staff

17 May 2013

by Sarah Zupko

11 Apr 2013

It’s a winning combination that has seen the band play at last year’s Les Inrocks Festival in Paris, as well as draw praise from Nylon Magazine and Clash Magazine. Now Coastal Cities has released a double A-side single featuring “Entropic” backed with “Nothing Ever Changes”. “Entropic” is a summerly blast of jangle joy and has us eagerly awaiting whatever is next for this outfit.

by Imran Khan

4 Apr 2013

Ados, a rising hip-hop star from Turkey, released his first proper commercial album Katarsis at the tail-end of 2012. A conscious effort to infuse a sturdy framework of robust beats with layers of tuneful harmonies, Katarsis also sees the rapper digging his way up to the open air of the mainstream from the underground where he toiled away for years, cultivating his own brand of indie aggro-hip-hop. Ados specializes in a kind of delivery that has him striking a curious balance between singing and rapping, flipping back and forth between vocal registers and riding a cool calm between a nuanced emotional cadence and a threatening swell of raging dramatics with an assured ease. It’s a defining feature that sets him apart from his contemporaries in Turkey’s underground hip-hop scene.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

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