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Monday, Nov 21, 2011
Old Drag Queens never die; they just go into social housing and live off welfare handouts, and shoplift.

Council House Movie Star is the up-coming screen and gallery debut of Gale Force, the drag persona of contemporary dance maker, performer and writer Mark Edward. This is Edward’s collaboration with award-winning filmmaker Rosa Fong (British Film Institute New Director’s award, Arts Council Black Arts Award and as Associate Producer: Best Feature at the Outfest Fusion Festival LA 2006, 2nd Prize Audience Award at Madrid International Gay & Lesbian Film Festival 2006 for feature film Cut Sleeve Boys) and award-winner Dr Mark Fremaux.


Gale Force’s plans are to be represented in all her glory in 3D and HD. She is nothing if not up-to-date; the original inspiration (in her own words) of the North of England ‘WAG’ culture, beloved of the British tabloids. Victoria Beckham had better watch out. Council House Movie Star will be premiered in Liverpool in 2012 and after that enjoy a national tour of galleries, cinemas, clubs – any venue that will have it if truth be told! Gale ain’t fussy! She will also provide interventionist and guerrilla art pieces (she can be very high-brow!) wherever they are needed. These will be documented and then reborn in major art galleries in Liverpool and Manchester as recreations of Gale’s multi-faceted, colourful life and encounters with her public. Move aside Tracey Emin and your ‘[Unmade] Bed’ (1998)! Gale’s installation will recreate her entire bed-sit apartment (beat that!) as well as her uninsured bling and her family relationships, as a single mum on welfare – with her kids and her ‘Anti’ Christy. If you’re really lucky Gale will appear in person at the gallery.


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Monday, Oct 10, 2011
Marilyn Manson, poet and performance artist.

Marilyn Manson gave a poetry reading in L.A., in support of The J. Paul Getty Trust. On 10 September, Manson read William Blake’s celebrated poem The Proverbs of Hell. The poem’s most popular line: “The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom.” But the best part is Manson’s decision to have a drink of some strange orange liquid at the poem’s conclusion. Fitting.



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Tuesday, Apr 5, 2011
"Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind" is the longest running show in Chicago history, despite the fact that it completely changes every week. PopMatters sits down with Neo-Futurist founder Greg Allen for a one-of-a-kind discussion ...

The title—Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind—is kind of wacky.  The content, however, is downright unpredictable.


Greg Allen crafted “Neo-Futurism” after spending much time studying the Italian Futurists while at Oberlin College, eventually bringing Too Much Light to Chicago in December of 1988.  Since then, this show—wherein 30 plays are performed within one hour, the plays themselves changing on a weekly basis—has not only become the longest running show in Chicago, but has also spawned a branch out in New York as well.  Between his work with the Neos, Allen has also written and directed plays all around the country, often to great acclaim.


Here, in this exclusive interview with PopMatters, Allen sits down with us to discuss the Neo-Futurist aesthetic, responds to the charge that Too Much Light is “short attention span theatre”, and attempts to turn a table upside down with only the help of audience applause ...



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Monday, Oct 18, 2010

It’s been a tale of two princes in English theatre this year, with Rory Kinnear’s take on the Dane at London’s National vying for first place with John Simm’s interpretation at Sheffield’s newly revamped Crucible. Simm’s angry, witty, spiky Hamlet has received mixed reviews, but he and a strong supporting cast succeed in bringing out the rich humour in what is undoubtedly one of the most psychologically complex of Shakespeare’s plays. Eminently quotable and reworkable, too—I counted at least five film titles in there…


[Watch video]


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Saturday, Feb 13, 2010
Lavish extravaganza overshadowed by an athlete’s tragic death.

A crowd of about 60,000 people was present at Vancouver’s BC Place Stadium for the opening ceremony of the 2010 Winter Olympics. Details about what exactly would happen were kept secret, though expectations were high because of Beijing’s expensive and critically renowned 2008 ceremony. In America, it garnered publicity because of the debut of the music video for the remake of “We Are the World”, which will raise money to aid Haiti. (Actually, the video aired about 13 minutes prior to the event.) $30 to $40 million dollars was spent on the LED screens that simulated tribal animal constellations, fabric hangings designed to look like icebergs and totem poles, high-wire acrobatics, pyrotechnics, lighting, costumed performers, and 108 projectors as Canadian celebrities including Bryan Adams, Nelly Furtado, Nikki Yanofsky, Sarah McLachlan, and k.d. lang performed.



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