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Friday, Nov 7, 2014
You know a music video is gonna be good when it begins with the burning of Barbie dolls. That's but one of many reasons why Ruby the RabbitFoot's latest video, "Misery", is worth a watch.

In his 7 out of 10 PopMatters review for Ruby the RabbitFoot’s latest album, New as Dew, Eric Risch wrote, “New as Dew shows the growth of Ruby the RabbitFoot as an assured songwriter who is less reliant upon studio magic that dotted her folk-tinged debut, No Weight No Chain. Be it a stroke of good luck or artistic focus, Kendrick has chosen—and now earned—a worthy moniker.”


Ruby the RabbitFoot (Ruby Kendrick) is certainly no garden variety singer/songwriter. Her eclectic personality and style are evident in all of the music she writes, and, as you can see below, these come out quite vividly in her music videos. Below you can watch the off-kilter video for the New as Dew track “Misery”. Don’t let the title mislead you, though: you won’t feel miserable after this delightfully dark little concoction.


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Friday, Nov 7, 2014
Alison Moyet hasn't lost an ounce of artistic vitality despite a long and productive 35-year career. For proof, give the live version of "All Cried Out", from her forthcoming live album minutes and seconds, a spin or three.

Former Yazoo member (or, for legal reasons in the US, Yaz) and stunning contralto Alison Moyet released her first studio LP, Alf, thirty years ago. Like any great artist, she hasn’t stopped committing herself to her craft since then. Best of all, it’s as if she hasn’t aged a day since then; her 2013 LP the minutes received some of the best press of her career. Following a world tour for the music of the minutes, Moyet has prepared a live album capturing that tour in action. Below you can stream “All Cried Out”, a track from Alf, reimagined for Moyet’s 2013 tour.


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Friday, Nov 7, 2014
Dallas, Texas troubador Ronnie Fauss calls the tune "The Big Catch" the "emotional anchor" of his just released album, Built to Break.

Following his 2012 debut LP I Am the Man You Know I’m Not, Texas songwriter Ronnie Fauss just released his followup to that record, titled Built to Break. Below you can stream “The Big Catch”, a track that Fauss views as critical to the album, calling it the music’s “emotional anchor”. Lyrically, “The Big Catch” examines the effects divorce has on children. As Fauss clarifies, though, this does not stem from anything happening in his life: It’s an interesting thing to explain at home: ‘I’m really happy; we’re all good. This is just a song I wrote.” However, he does add, “I think there’s a little bit of truth and a little bit of fiction in every single one of my songs.” Fauss’ wise words here bring to mind one of the great truths of songwriting; as Warren Zevon put it, “In the songwriting business, there isn’t a section for fiction and non-fiction. It’s all mixed together.”


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Thursday, Nov 6, 2014
The Seattle indie rockers Smokey Brights have a complex and intriguing new album in Taste for Blood.

Right from the minute you first lay eyes on its sleeve art, Taste for Blood intrigues. The name of the album by the Seattle-based Smokey Brights suggests a vampiric theme running throughout the music, but lyrically this is miles from Twilight and its ilk. Like the music of Taste for Blood, the lyrics here are enigmatic and complex. The title track finds the band singing, “I remember / We could read the wind like braille”. Such complex imagery is matched splendidly by the music, which spans a whole gamut of sonic styles, from indie (the catchy title cut) to folk (“West Texas Vampyre”) to blue-eyed soul (“If I Can’t Change Your Mind”). It’s the kind of listen that sidesteps every expectation you could have of it.


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Wednesday, Nov 5, 2014
The sisterly Fort Collins, CO quartet SHEL teamed up with Gareth Dunlop for "Hold On", a track off of the soundtrack to the new Nicolas Sparks adaptation The Best of Me.

The Fort Collins, Colorado band SHEL is comprised of sisters Sarah, Hanna, Eva, and Liza. The convivial sound of the quartet’s music could easily be chalked up to its family camaraderie, but there’s also the matter of the classical training that goes into its music. With deep training on the violin (Sarah), harp (Liza), mandolin (Eva), and piano (Hannah), it’s no wonder the band’s music is as meticulously composed as it is.


Joined by Gareth Dunlop for the track “Hold On”, a number off of the soundrack to the new Nicolas Sparks film adaptation, The Best of Me. Even if one isn’t a fan of Sparks’ brand of schmaltzy romance, there’s still plenty to love in the tender, lovelorn harmonies of “Hold On”, captured nicely in the intimate video performance below.


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