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by PopMatters Staff

12 Apr 2016


Indie folk singer-songwriter Kyle Britton writes about the dark depths of the soul in a compelling and self-confessional manner. Folk music is all about honesty, engaging stories and music standing for something. It may sound pretty, but there’s always lyrical material to rouse the emotions. Britton’s latest single “Villain” may as well be a case study for all of the qualities previously mentioned. In the tune, Britton dissects a relationship gone wrong with biting realism and emotional honesty. Meanwhile he’s backed up by seasoned Los Angeles musicians who have worked for the likes of Daniel Lanois, Macy Gray, Elle King, and Dave Matthews Band. Of the song, Britton says that “everybody has that voice in their heads which temps them towards less than favorable choices. I wrote this song as a warning that I, at the time, was letting that voice control everything I did.”

by Eric Risch

11 Apr 2016


Photo: Erin Rambo

“I had a dream I wrote a song called ‘Disintegrator’ so I woke up and wrote a song called ‘Disintegrator,’” noted Daniel Markham as an introduction to his latest single at a recent house show in Baltimore, Maryland. A man out of place and time, the Denton, Texas singer/songwriter drew inspiration from the Alternative Nation era of rock on 2013 debut, Ruined My Life. Lamenting the breakup of R.E.M. on “Favorite Band”, Markham followed up with his own Monster on 2014’s Pretty Bitchin’.

by PopMatters Staff

11 Apr 2016


Metric bassist Joshua Winstead has been with the band through all six of their recordings and now he’s stepping out for a solo effort that will be offered as a pay-what-you-want album through his website joshuawinstead.com. MMXX will release June 3rd via Royal Cut Records and Winstead made the record as an effort to establish his own unique voice and to explore dealing with racism as an empathetic person.

by PopMatters Staff

6 Apr 2016


Tim Darcy, the guitarist/vocalist for post-punk band Ought, has created a new experimental, spoken word project in conjunction with Andrea-Jane Cornell, a Montreal-based music improvisor. Too Significant to Ignore, released March 18th via NNA Tapes, pairs dense and psychedelic layers of electronics and field recordings with Darcy’s surreal spoken word poetry, delivered in droll and ironic tones. The result suggests humans face existential angst, loneliness and dislocation as a result of technology’s onslaught. So much comes at us so quickly in the early 21st century, constant blips of data delivered through the myriad devices that we own, rent or borrow. This recording brilliantly evokes how that actually feels and it provokes serious thought, causing us to reflect on our place in the world as well as what it really means to be human. This is art.

by Sarah Zupko

6 Apr 2016


Photo: Shervin Lainez

Once upon a time, Gabe Dixon fronted the Gabe Dixon Band, which he formed back in 1999 while at the University of Miami as a piano-fronted Southern rock band. The band worked with Concord Records and earned comparisons to the Ben Folds Five. Fast forward to 2016 and Dixon is a solo artist with a hot new sophomore solo record, Turns to Gold, releasing Friday. Dixon still employs the rock energy, but he’s very much become an Americana artist now and the genre suits him to a tee, allowing him to get more soulful with his vocals and explore new sounds, while focusing on creating fundamentally craftsman-like songs that tell stories of peoples’ lives.

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Moving Pixels Podcast: The Best Games of 2016

// Moving Pixels

"The Moving Pixels Podcast counts down our top five games of 2016.

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