Latest Blog Posts

by Will Rivitz

10 Aug 2016


Photo: Jason Majadero

Changüí Majadero make, as the name might suggest, changüí, a Cuban style of music defined by stuttering hand drums and twirling guitars and bass. It’s an exercise in rhythmic gymnastics, providing the rump-shaking verve of salsa, one of its descendants. “Vamos Pal Guaso” shakes and shivers, the bassline jumping every which way behind acrobatic vocal harmonies. Hypnotically repetitive and gloriously syncopated, the song is captivating and liberating.

Changüí Majadero’s El Changüí Majadero releases September 16th.

by Will Rivitz

9 Aug 2016


Photo: Anna Webber

Tattletale Saints make country as it originally was, an offshoot of blues angled towards the Old West. “Big City Women” is a tale of woe and disillusionment wrapped up in soft guitar and upright bass, a lament of the anonymizing power of the city in a homey package. The tale of the lost love has been told thousands of times, but it’s powerful enough to keep spinning—and “Big City Women” shows it’s not dead yet.

by Will Rivitz

9 Aug 2016


The Dexateens’ “Teenage Hallelujah” is, as the title would suggest, an ode to the hedonism and stupidity that comes with being a teenager from the perspective of the older and jaded. Accentuating that hedonism is a guitar onslaught that rushes through the song’s two minutes, ripping solos and broken-amp sound manipulation taking center stage. It’s the quintessential Southern rock song, dusty and distorted and frenetic. Teenagers grow up fast, so this song speeds forth appropriately.

by Will Rivitz

9 Aug 2016


Jordan DePaul’s electric country has rightfully turned heads, and the young singer’s fierceness makes for a captivating listen. Alongside his newest video, for “No Good For You” directed by Brayden Heath, we’ve got an exclusive interview with the artist. Have a read (and listen) below. “No Good For You” appears on DePaul’s latest release, Forces EP.

by Will Rivitz

9 Aug 2016


The Conquerors’ “Turned Me to Stone” is strictly vintage. It’s such a pitch-perfect recreation of Help!-era Beatles that it’s hard to believe it’s a new song. There’s the simple yet masterful pentatonic guitar solo, the three-vocal harmonies, the guttural yells which bring the song through transitions. Even the band’s pictures, all in suits and immaculately arrayed, suggests that they could have been heartthrobs in the ‘60s. There’s a reason the Beatles were so popular back in the day, and the Conquerors’ excellent approximation of that success is ample proof why.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Specter of Multiplayer Hangs Over 'Door Kickers'

// Moving Pixels

"Door Kickers is not a multiplayer game, but for a while there, I couldn’t tell the difference.

READ the article