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Having now just dropped its debut, the Portland, Oregon-based Hawks Do Not Share have now readied their latest music video for the public eye. The song, “Break Even”, features a submerged, echoey vocal that fans of Chelsea Wolfe will find appeal in. Hawks Do Not Share, however, opt for a murky synth background to the vocals rather than that goth chanteuse‘s dark, guitar-driven rock.

Springfield, Missouri musician Casey Jack makes the kind of guitar-driven music that aspiring teenagers the world over hope to put to tape. His music is best described as guitar pop with a sharp dash of fuzzed-out punk energy. Casey Jack, his debut LP, features the sort of instrumental lineup quite common to many of the early ‘00’s rock revival outfits: guitar, bass, drums, and some grungy vocals. But rather than go straight for the jugular, Jack employs a keen ear for pop in constructing these tunes, reining in what otherwise might have been full-on rock assaults to their simplest, catchiest cores.

Unlike Mumford & Sons, whose old-timey name suggests an authenticity that is more manufactured than genuine, Sons of Bill are actually what their name implies. The Sons of Bill are actually the sons of William Wilson, professor emeritus of theology and literature at the University of Virginia. (The group hails from Charlottesville.) Sons of Bill let their sharp songcraft and careful lyricism shine on “Brand New Paradigm”, a track off of their forthcoming album Love & Logic.

When one things of sunny beach locales, Belfast, Northern Ireland probably doesn’t come to mind. But by the sound of Go Wolf, the indie electro-pop group responsible for “Talk to You”, one could be easily fooled into thinking so. Go Wolf made a splash earlier this summer with “One More Night”, and now, with “Talk to You”, they’re poised to take up even more spaces on beach trip playlists the world over. From its simple chorus hook to its bouncy synths, the song runs the gamut of summer song characteristics, and marks yet another promising entry from these up-and-comers.

The video for Oh, Jeremiah’s “Beautiful Monster”, a cut off of its latest EP, Our Very Own Kingdom, is indicative of the sonic the band has created for itself. Shot in a cozy, bookshelf-adorned room, the group—fronted by Jeremy Strickin, who wields a nifty parlor guitar—spins a yarn about the dangers of falling for someone that you know is dangerous. The band’s style on “Beautiful Monster” brings to mind Josh Ritter at his most intimate: warm, inviting, and altogether pleasing to the ear.

//Blogs

Is Black Widow Still a Hero? Dissecting the Misogynistic Outrage Against the Avengers

// Short Ends and Leader

"Black Widow may very well be the pinnacle of the modern action heroine, so why is there so much backlash about her role in the new Avengers film?

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