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Friday, Jun 7, 2013
by PopMatters Staff
Georgia"s Tedo Stone and band traffic in a brand of '70s-esque, swaggering, peach fuzzy guitar rock, drawing influence from T. Rex most notably.

It’s a sound bound to interest Strokes fans, as well as anyone who appreciates melodic rock music. Tedo Stone will be releasing his debut album, Good Go Bad, on July 9th via the always-interesting This Is American Music label. Today we present the premiere the lead single, “Taste”, which Stone tells us all about in his own words…


“Even though it’s the the lead single on my new record, Good Go Bad, ‘Taste’ has actually been around almost five years. It was one of those songs that comes to you like lightning—I wrote the whole thing in less than an hour. When we recorded it in the studio, we recreated my demo almost exactly, which was unusual for this record; it’s the only song that came out exactly as I had envisioned. It’s a go-get-‘em, carpe-diem kinda song, a get-off-your-ass-and-do-something song. It’s about that conflict everyone experiences in their head—‘Do I sit on the couch and relax at home today, or do I get out and do something with my life?’ Both are good for different reasons, but ‘Taste’ is about finding balance between the two. At the end of the day, it’s a fun, catchy little pop song everyone in the band looks forward to playing in our live sets.”—Tedo Stone


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Thursday, Jun 6, 2013
by PopMatters Staff
“Utopia”, the new track by Toronto's Nightbox, sounds utopian, conjuring up images of a brighter, better future.

“Utopia”, the new track by Toronto disco revivalists Nightbox, sounds, well, utopian, as its gleaming synths and pulsing rhythmic elements conjures up images of a brighter, better future. When singer Jake Bitove calls out, “Take you away / Take you away / Utopia,” in his smooth, high-but-not-too-high cadence, it’s an offer that’s hard to refuse, whether he’s welcoming you to the dancefloor or some city of tomorrow. But it’s when the buzzier guitar textures enter the scene that this “Utopia” feels the most real, giving the neon-lit atmosphere some grounding.


Tagged as: nightbox, premiere
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Wednesday, Jun 5, 2013
by PopMatters Staff
Las Vegas based singer/rapper Big B seamlessly blends hip-hop and rock with an occasional reggae twist.

His latest LP, Fool’s Gold, will release on July 9th via Suburban Noize. The title is important as it reflects Big B’s growing cynicism about the music industry, a common sentiment these days. “I’ve been making records for such a long time now and after a while you start to realize that the whole music industry is fake,” says Big B. “People get caught up in chasing this idea of success that just doesn’t exist. People who window shop never see the inside of a store unless they walk in. You could have the coolest looking store front ever, but when you open it up its still just a junk yard inside. That’s the way I see the music business. It sounds glamorous until you see it for what it really is, which is fool’s gold.”


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Wednesday, Jun 5, 2013
by PopMatters Staff
New Romantic founders return with their first new music in 29 years, just in time for the re-emergence of synth-pop as a major creative force.

Back in the late ‘70s and early ‘80s, New Wave spanned a sub-genre called New Romantic based around the same synthesizer beats as New Wave, but with an even greater emphasis on the pop side of the equation, with glamorous hair and fashion being integral to the genre’s sensibility. It sprang out of the London clubs back in 1979, heavily influenced by the music and style of David Bowie and Roxy Music. Visage was right there at the beginning, the seed of the burgeoning movement at the right place and time. Steve Strange worked as the doorman at the Blitz nightclub and Rusty Egan was the club’s DJ and from that locale the two of them joined forces with Ultravox’s Billy Currie and Midge Ure to form Visage.


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Friday, May 31, 2013
by PopMatters Staff
If you combined Kate Bush's vocals with Smashing Pumpkins at their dream-poppiest, you might just come up with Spotlight Kid's "Sugar Pills".

Sure, you can’t help but appreciate the obvious, that Spotlight Kid’s new single “Sugar Pills” comes off like Kate Bush singing “Running Up That Hill” with Smashing Pumpkins at their Siamese Dream dream-poppiest backing her. Whether that combination sounds like an idea whose time has come or an improbable hybrid, Spotlight Kid pulls it off on “Sugar Pills”, highlighting its own expert hand in shaping melodic waves of noise. There’s just a palpable enthusiasm and energy to the Nottingham group’s propulsive guitar-driven approach that lets “Sugar Pills” stand on its own, no matter who or what it reminds you of.


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