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by Will Rivitz

17 Aug 2016


Vandoliers’ “Wildflower” is largely based in straightforward country music, a touch of shout-along folk-punk contouring its edges. Instrumentally, it’s a very complex song, horns trading off with strings and banjo under vocalist Joshua Fleming’s strained yell. Its instrumental complications and genre tropes fit its subject matter appropriately — it’s about the lost and broken, those from whom we’ve had to move on. It’s a dark song with a touch of brightness and hope, a tone kept consistent by the way it occasionally soars far above its gloomy guitar spine.

by Will Rivitz

17 Aug 2016


Beginners’ “Stereo”, as the title’s connotations might suggest, takes a few cues from the ‘80s. Big, watery snares are the most noticeable, with cheeky synths and schlocky strings adding to the effect. It’s very much a modern song, though — the arpeggiation, distorted bassline, and vocal chops are straight out of radio pop-house. It’s a laid-back tune as ready for blasting from a Camaro system as from Spotify, and that timelessness is a wonderful thing.

by Will Rivitz

17 Aug 2016


Photo: Henry Diltz

Paige Calico‘s “The Hard Way” is pristinely loopy Americana, a gorgeous arrangement warped just a touch by a layer of sand and dirt. Calico sings dreamily over lolling guitar and choral backdrop, a touch of chamber pop influencing the song’s hazy make. Given that it’s a song about the strength and enigmatic nature of love, its semi-lucid atmosphere fits it like a glove.

by Will Rivitz

15 Aug 2016


LOVECAT‘s “Song For Eternity” is a playful, bouncy synthpop piece, a strange choice given that its subject matter is the eternally masochistic struggle to make good art. In some sense, though, this is a fair approach — the best art often sounds effortless, and couching the realities of creation in springy synths and dance-ready drums bridges that divide between appearance and what lies beneath. It’s a line LOVECAT toes pretty frequently — his subject matter often dour, its instrumental bedding often light. If “Song For Eternity” shows anything, it’s that this duality can still sound cohesive.

by Will Rivitz

15 Aug 2016


“You make me want to dance to the music,” sings Robert Finley, and it’s pretty hard not to sympathize. “You Make Me Want to Dance” is a slab of dirty, sexy soul, gyrating around a firm funk backbeat in much the same way as most pairs of hips exposed to this song might. Finley’s Southern croon soars above sensual guitar and horns, reveling in the freedom the music provides and exploring the crannies of the instrumentation. If you need something to get you moving this Monday, this should be the ticket.

//Mixed media
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The Specter of Multiplayer Hangs Over 'Door Kickers'

// Moving Pixels

"Door Kickers is not a multiplayer game, but for a while there, I couldn’t tell the difference.

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