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by PopMatters Staff

6 Apr 2016


Indie pop band Coastgaard specializes in atmospheric and cinematic pop music, underpinned with surf guitar sounds from the ‘60s (The Ventures). Two members of the group come from a film background, with Matt Miller (guitar, lead vocals), Sean Glassman (guitar, vocals, keys) both working in film and video editing. Meanwhile, Paolo Codega (bass, vocals) and Brian D’Alessandro (drums, vocals, keys) are both scientists with the former being a neuroscientist and the latter a statistician. This melding of art and science pays dividends in the unique sound of the group as they use pop tropes to explore time and space in music. Coastgaard‘s new album, Devil on the Balcony, is out now and today the band is sharing the video for their latest single “A Well Adjusted Man”, a tune that relies heavily on the rhythms and moods of surf rock in how it plays with the idea of rolling waves.

by PopMatters Staff

6 Apr 2016


Irish indie pop band Land Lovers look to the late ‘50s and early ‘60s for inspiration and focuses on creating little nuggets of delicious pop confection. For example on “Angeline”, which we are premiering today, one can hear the jangly pop guitars and pristine harmonies of the Searchers (think “Needles and Pins”). Land Lovers are no retro project though, they simply draw ideas from popular music of the past and then expand on them in a modern fashion. Land Lovers will appeal to fans of melodic guitar pop and anyone with an ear for a great hook. Like the great British pop band the Beautiful South, or Paul Heaton’s earlier project, the Housemartins, Land Lovers use ironic, critical and occasionally dark lyrics underneath the sheen of gorgeous music. It’s subversive and relevant, just what a memorable pop tunes needs.

by PopMatters Staff

5 Apr 2016


Graham Murawsky aka Factor Chandelier is about to release his fifth solo album, Factoria, that features an amazing batch of guest vocalists, including Open Mike Eagle, Awol One, Gregory Pepper, Ceschi, and Myka 9. Factor Chandelier conceived of this project as something of a concept album, telling the story of Factoria, a town that currently sits under Silverwood Heights in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Factor’s hometown.

Originally, the plan was to build a massive industrial city called Factoria. The project collapsed and the town’s remains are buried beneath Silverwood Heights. It’s a compelling project and today we bring you the premiere of “I Want to Go”. Rapper Kirby Dominant brings his unique voice to the table on the track “I Want to Go” when he asks: “How do you build a foundation in a shaky world?” Factor and Dominant are Paranoid Castle, and they describe themselves as the group you popped your first bottle of Veuve with or shared a “vodka soda with the lime”. This is classic hip-hop with soulful rhythms and modern beats that manage to evoke the past.

by Matthew Fiander

5 Apr 2016


North Carolina’s Some Army fought to make their debut record, One Stone and Too Many Birds. After the success of a self-recorded EP, recording of a full-length record stalled. Deadlines passed by and band members started new projects. But Some Army persisted, with songwriter Russell Baggett left studios behind to finish the record is a daisy-chain of DIY settings. The resulting record has the kind of effortless sound and confidence that only comes organically out of a shit load of effort and questions along the way.

by PopMatters Staff

5 Apr 2016


Photos: Kristina Moravec and KEXP

Indie rockers, garage punkers Ex Hex played Pickathon last year and today we present the premiere of that performance. These women rock hard, but keep it basic like any great punk band. The guitar interplay is particularly thrilling with its minimalism and jagged edges. At Pickathon, you’ll see all manner of artists across genres with the common denominator being that they’re all good.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Smudge and Jury: The Punk-Noir Pulp of 'I, The Jury'

// Short Ends and Leader

"With all the roughneck charm of a '40 pulp novel and much style to spare, I, The Jury is a good, popcorn-filling yarn.

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