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Wednesday, Feb 2, 2011
by PopMatters Staff
Junior Senior's Jesper Mortensen teams with Leah Hennessey for fuzzy, pop-punk debut.

When Junior Senior disbanded, Denmark’s Jesper Mortensen headed to London and then on to New York City to form a new pop band. Teaming with Leah Hennessey, who just happens to be the step-daughter of New York Dolls main man David Johansen, the two formed MAKE OUT. “What U Doing Later?” highlights the punky pop approach the band are taking, with a fuzzy, gritty ‘70s Lower East Side aesthetic at the forefront, something we’re hearing a lot more of these days. MAKE OUT release their debut EP How To later this month (22 February) and also have an upcoming show at New York’s Tammany Hall on 10 February.


SONG LIST
01 I Don’t Want Anybody That Wants Me
02 What U Doing Later?
03 True Love Is Just Too Hard to Find


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Monday, Jan 31, 2011
The Two Koreas new tune, "Midnight Brown", is a frenetic tune bursting at the seams with both energy and instant catchiness.

The Two Koreas jagged, riff-heavy rock samples from the glory decades in music’s recent past, with nods to ‘60s garage beat, ‘70s British punk, ‘80s post-punk, and ‘90s alternative rock, a sound the band labels “glacial garage”. The Toronto band’s 2007 sophomore effort Altruists tore it up on Canadian radio and earned the group some early blog buzz. The haven’t lost a step in the past four years as they are about to unleash their latest, Science Island on 1 March. “Midnight Brown” is a frenetic tune bursting at the seams with both energy and instant catchiness. It reverberates in the head long after the last notes have sounded, creating a lasting impression in a crowded musical world stocked with ephemeral moments.


 



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Thursday, Jan 27, 2011
On Lohio's debut video for “Adelai”, which is the lead single for Family Tree, the group aims for an Arcade Fire-like grand statement—complete with a visual meditation on adolescent wistfulness and anxiety—and the effort pays off brilliantly.

On Lohio’s new five-song EP Family Tree, the Pittsburg-based band blend indie-folk and chamber pop, topped with male/female vocal dynamics, creating a sound packed with wholehearted rhythmic nuances and lush arrangements. Lohio—which consists of singer/songwriter Greg Dutton, bassist/vocalist Liz Adams, guitarist Erik Cirelli and drummer Dave Bubbenheim—says one of their goals on the EP was to paint a “portrait of the way a band can become your family”, and the end result is their most captivating work yet. On Lohio’s debut video for “Adelai”, which is the lead single for Family Tree, the group aims for an Arcade Fire-like grand statement—complete with a visual meditation on adolescent wistfulness and anxiety—and the effort pays off brilliantly. The band, which has shared the stage with the likes of Ra Ra Riot, the Avett Brothers and Tokyo Police Club, are set to hit the road next month (the dates are listed below). You can stream or download Family Tree over at Lohio’s Bandcamp website.



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Thursday, Jan 27, 2011
by PopMatters Staff
France's Emilie Simon relocates to NYC and records a "transcription of the impression [she] had of New York, with both a black and white musical feel to it."

France’s Emilie Simon has conquered her home country with hit records and three Victoires de la Musique wins, which is the akin to the Grammys. A restless soul, she’s moved to Brooklyn to begin the next stage of her musical adventures. Her latest album is The Big Machine and “Rainbow” is the new poppy single. Guests on the record include Kelly Pratt and Jeremy Gara from Arcade Fire, and Jon Natchez from Beirut. As a transplant to the Big Apple, Simon has an outsider’s fascination with the city and has described the intent of The Big Machine as “the transcription of the impression I had of New York, with both a black and white musical feel to it, urban, heavy on bass and drums and with explosions of colour and light from the synths.”



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Thursday, Jan 27, 2011
Anika captures the fractured cultural decadence of the Weimar Republic and the musical wandering of the '80s post-punk era while miraculously sounding resolutely futuristic.

Berlin/London/Bristol-based Anika captures the fractured cultural decadence of the Weimar Republic and the musical wandering of the ‘80s post-punk era while miraculously sounding resolutely futuristic. It’s quite the hat trick and her music has been beguiling critics and audiences alike in growing numbers over the past year. This live performance of “I Go to Sleep” beautifully illustrates that simultaneously historic and timeless aesthetic. Anika released her self-titled debut this past December via Stones Throw and had none other than Geoff Barrow of Portishead / Beak> handling the production. She has a number of upcoming DJ gigs that will be happenings, so find your way to one of these listed below.



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