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by Brice Ezell

25 Sep 2014


Drummer Julian Bahula was hugely prolific in the South African jazz scene in the mid-to-late ‘60’s, making music with groups such as the Malombo Jazz Makers, Jabula, and Jazz Afrika. Fans of world and jazz music can’t afford to miss his unique brand of rhythmic effervescence.

by Eric Risch

25 Sep 2014


Smoky Americana by way of Germany, singer/songwriter Pauline Andrès will release her debut album, All Them Ghosts, on 14 October.

All Them Ghosts’s 11 literate observations of truth, half-lies and possible falsehoods were birthed over a period of four years and in as many countries. Taking a year to record, the process of bringing All Them Ghosts to life was fraught with sickness, personnel issues and financial strife. Persevering with the help of cigarettes and wine, Andrès has released the album’s first single, “Patsy Cline”, a twisted love story that pays homage to the country matriarch.

by Brice Ezell

24 Sep 2014


Eric Von Haessler’s documentary Scarred But Smarter tells the tale of a band that, while under the radar by the average person’s standards, have nonetheless remained vital and influential over the course of its now 30-year tenure: the Atlanta indie rock outfit Drivin’ N’ Cryin’. Few bands last as long as this trio, comprised of singer/songwriter Kevn Kinney, guitarist Tim Nielsenand, and drummer Paul Lenz; that the group has remained headstrong is but one of many reasons why a film about its musical journey is so fascinating a document.

by Brice Ezell

24 Sep 2014


Earlier this year, Bullett wrote of the New Orleans musician Boyfriend, “Teacher by day, cabaret rapper by night, we watched the 25-year-old striptease, gyrate, and motorboat on Monday night at Baby’s All Right [in Brooklyn].” As far as descriptions go, that one is as enticing as it gets, a fact reflected in the music of Boyfriend herself. The gender-bending nature of her performance name is also indicative of her satirical streak; in her words, her music “straddles the line between satire and straight-up music.”

by Arnold Pan

23 Sep 2014


Going on 30 years together now, underground provocateurs Mecca Normal are still at it pushing buttons with their art-minded and politically charged music. But those more familiar with the searing, rough-hewn sound of Mecca Normal’s best-known works might be surprised to the hear the layered melodies and expansive compositions of Empathy for the Evil, the Vancouver duo’s first full-length effort in eight years. What’s a constant here, though, is the intellectual depth and socially engaged intensity that Jean Smith and David Lester have been known for across numerous artistic media. PopMatters caught up with Smith to find out more about the concepts behind Empathy for the Evil and how her and Lester’s work in writing and visual arts relate to their music. Empathy for the Evil is releasing on September 30 via M’lady’s Records and Mecca Normal embark on a new tour this week (see the dates below). Their new video for the album track “Between Livermore & Tracy” premieres here on PopMatters.

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