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by Will Rivitz

19 Jul 2016


The Jezabels have rightfully broken through into the pop-rock elite, especially on the strength of this year’s excellent Synthia. “Smile” is proof that their position is warranted, flowing from a deceptive soft rock intro to a chorus that strikes with the force of a gale. It’s latently ferocious, waiting until just the right moment to bite with swirling guitars and crashing percussion operating under lead singer Hayley Mary’s misanthropic howl. The song’s wandering ethos fits in well with the video, featuring Mary’s best “Bittersweet Symphony” impression: she wanders from place to place, not settling down for even a moment, while relishing the music behind her.

by Will Rivitz

19 Jul 2016


Elizabeth Hunter‘s “Coming for You” is impressive in just how much it does right. There’s the instrumental, a Motown-influenced slammer with butter-smooth horns and luscious organ. There’s the vocal, a killer case of blue-eyed soul drawing heavily from Amy Winehouse’s days with Mark Ronson and suave harmonizing up the wazoo. Most importantly, though, Hunter struts forward with blinding energy, loud and dynamic and alive. It’ll truly be a shame if “Coming for You” doesn’t break through, since I haven’t heard a song that’s quite so sure to get people up and dancing in a while.

by PopMatters Staff

18 Jul 2016


Pryor Stroud: Taken from Mvula’s latest release The Dreaming Room, “Show Me Love” is an incantatory, gospel-tinged art-pop hymnal that drifts from moments of deep personal introspection to fissions of out-of-body spiritual awareness. The climactic eruption of orchestration is startling in its intensity; over it, Mvula repeats the title phrase over and over and over again, trying to stretch it out, to discover its true contents and phonetic subtleties, and to discern if expressing her love in the exact right way—“You show me love / You show me love / You show me love”—can somehow approximate the true feeling it gives her. [8/10]

by Eric Risch

18 Jul 2016


Musical malcontent Adam Payne needs action. As the ringleader of Residual Echoes, Payne has released three fistfuls of albums this century while splitting time playing with other acts including 6 Organs of Admittance, Cass McCombs, Gun Outfit and King Tuff to name just a few.

by Will Rivitz

18 Jul 2016


The video for Cowboy Mouth‘s “Broken Up” is partly set in a brewery, which is an accurate distillation (pardon the pun) of the song’s sound. It’s a chunk of cheeky punk rock along the lines of the Dropkick Murphys, simple and memorable I-V-I chord progression and loud, crashing drums. Drummer and lead singer Fred LeBlanc’s nasally vocals properly fit the snarky vibe of the song’s lyrics, a kind of “screw you” to the girl who’s just broken up with the narrator. It’s altogether a cheery ode to the break-up — and, given the wholesome, raucous punk featured herein, the video and lyrics fit perfectly with the music.

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Call For Papers: Celebrating Star Trek's 50th Anniversary

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"To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the hit franchise, PopMatters seeks submissions about Star Trek, including: the TV series, from The Original Series (TOS) to the highly anticipated 2017 new installment; the films, both the originals and the J.J. Abrams reboot; and ancillary materials such as novelizations, comic books, videogames, etc.

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