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by PopMatters Staff

9 May 2016


Photo: Cara Robbins

Pryor Stroud: Lifted from Prism Tats’ eponymous LP, “Creep Out // Freak Out” is a freak-punk maelstrom whipped along by an unrelenting sexual pressure. Singer Garett van der Spek seems to be both animated and afflicted by desire, a paradox that enlivens his voice with a tortured yet masochistically amped-up poeticism. This paradox is also present in the guitar, which wields a pure thrash-this-out-of-my-system punk ethic that only intensifies as the song surges toward its end. “I’m gonna creep you out / I’m going freak you out”, van der Spek repeats, so certain of his own perversity that he feels like he should just own up and admit it. But what is there to admit? The guitar is there to tell you: something violent, sickening to some, a brutality of skin that’s best left said in the flesh. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

9 May 2016


Chris Ingalls: “Church” is a schizophrenic mashup of EDM with a healthy dose of funk, but it’s a rather unsteady, jittery funk, full of cowbells, distorted vocal samples and a beat that seems too rushed and wobbly to induce dancefloor mayhem. Davis takes his cues from P-Funk, turning the grooves on their ear while maintaining a unique vision. Weird and fun. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

9 May 2016


Emmanuel Elone: I shouldn’t like this song as much as I do. The groove is decent yet uninspired, the lyrics are passable yet generic, and the singing is ok but nothing to call home about. “Move and Shout” isn’t much more than disco nostalgia, but I would be lying if I said that I wasn’t bobbing my head to the funky guitar riff or singing the chorus in my head by the end of the song. It’s not a great track nor is it an original one, but it is entertaining and catchy nonetheless. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

9 May 2016


Seattle singer-songwriter David Nyro writes bravely about matters of the heart in masterfully constructed and composed songs. In fact, he’s a creator at heart, so much so that he will turn the singing of a song over to another performer if they suit the song ideally. For his latest tune, “Violence of the Heart”, Nyro brought on fellow Seattle singer-songwriter Katie Kuffel to sing this heart-rending tale of emotional violence in relationships. Kuffel offers up just the right amount of pathos and feeling to carry the song amidst gorgeous strings and piano-led music. The song is both sensitive and anthemic at the same time and it will appear on Nyro’s upcoming album later this year.

by PopMatters Staff

9 May 2016


Photo: Scott Troyan

Timothy Gabriele: Absolutely gorgeous and fulfilling postproduction harp music with a VHS eyephoria video as an ecstatic bonus. Harp is a naturally evocative instrument, its reliance on overtone and naturally occurring reverberation producing tingly vaporous trails that reinforce the transience of each note, but Lattimore has a mystical way with the effects she lays over her chosen accessory, stretching some passages to ring in persistent nearly cacophonous loops while plunging other notes deep below sea level to bob and weave as the mix persists in a psychedelic swirl of chromatic hues. [9/10]

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