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by Nathan Wisnicki

8 Aug 2011

That crotchety old man shouldn’t fool anyone: Spain’s finest filmmaker was farcically compelled by humanity’s blemishes and particulars—he just filtered them through stinging humor and outlandish narrative. And while Luis Buñuel is remembered for the lingering threats of violence or frank sexual encounter in his films, his aesthetic was so loosely-confined that he was never exploitative; there’s a casual sensuality to even his most seemingly-mundane scenes.

Born at the start of the 20th century, Buñuel was able to witness (and take part in) the changes that were carried through that century’s premier art form. Un Chien Andalou, needs little explanation to cinephiles: made with one Salvador Dalí, it remains a quintessential example of 1920s Parisian decadence, standing as the first great cinematic immersion into full-blown surrealism.

Read the rest of the entry within our 100 Essential Directors series.

by Dylan Nelson

8 Aug 2011

In an industry haunted by the individualistic expectations of auteur theory and often hobbled by the overbearing ministrations of government intervention, Robert Bresson stands out as an unmistakable independent with a formidable personal vision. Justified by the principles and philosophy outlined in his personal notes, Notes on the Cinematographer, written from 1950 to 1974 and published in English in 1997, Bresson set about fashioning a new kind of cinematic language. He rejected traditional film elements such as professional actors and commissioned scores, which he described as filmed theater, and limited himself to the essentials, striving to create in his films an organic synthesis of music and painting.

Read the rest of the entry within our 100 Essential Directors series.

by Timothy Gabriele

8 Aug 2011

Let’s be blunt.  It’s unlikely that Plaid’s debut single from their forthcoming album Scintilli will become as anthemic or well-known a tune as “Eyen” or their remix of Björk’s “All Is Full of Love”. However, there is a beauty to the abstract tendrils of their freeform sound here, which veers far closer to avant-classical than their previous melodicisms. This is reinforced by the video, featured an anachronistic Chinese mistress submerged in water, twisting and dancing in sensual parallax to a wafting octopus.

by PopMatters Staff

5 Aug 2011

Sole aka Tim Holland recently released his third album with the Skyrider Band titled Hello Cruel World, which seems particularly apropos to reference on a day following a 500-plus drop in the Dow. But really this is not as cynical as it sounds. In fact Sole sees his current music as fully embracing the artistic possibilities of the DIY sensibility and all of the personal freedom and responsibility that DIY implies. On Hello Cruel World, he and his band have teamed with a number of indie’s leading lights, including Xiu Xiu, Pictureplane, Sage Francis, and more. This new tune “Immortality” features a collaboration with animation artist, Dave Lando. Sole said of the video, “It’s a song about futurist/inventor Ray Kurzweil and the modern search for immortality, we teamed up with Decadence Comics artist Dave Lando to create a pretty interesting ‘hard science fiction’ animation.”

by Jacob Adams

5 Aug 2011

Just a couple weeks after their acclaimed performance at Chicago’s Pitchfork Music Festival, tUnE-yArDs made their national television debut (Monday, August 1) on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. With the addition of ?uestlove on drums and Black Thought even rapping a verse near the end of the tune, this song is brimming with unbridled energy. Let’s hope the spontaneity and utter joy of this performance will bring Merrill Garbus’ insanely creative music to a larger audience.  It deserves to be heard by everyone.

//Mixed media

Tricks or Treats? Ten Halloween Blu-rays That May Disrupt Your Life

// Short Ends and Leader

"The best of this stuff'll kill you.

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