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by Steve Horowitz

6 Jul 2011


Singer songwriter Brigitte DeMeyer moved to Nashville from the Bay Area last year. Her new material (her next album Rose of Jericho is due to drop at the end of August) shows the notable influence the Tennessee blues and Southern gospel have had on her. This is especially notable on the rollicking “Amen Said the Deacon” whose snaky chugga chugga rhythms make you want to jump up and testify. When DeMeyer sings about Adam and Eve and getting to heaven, you are ready to take a bite of the apple and learn more. The grit in her voice works to wear down the listener’s resistance and give in to the truth of the song. “Maybe all that churchin’” doesn’t mean a thing, but the Lord can be found in mysterious ways. Let us pray in song, sister!

by John Garratt

5 Jul 2011


Kids music act Hullabaloo along with Stefan Shepherd of the Zooglobble kids music blog hosted a little something called the Kindie Songwriting Club (I’m guessing that’s Kid + Indie…). The idea was for multiple songwriters to write a song about the same subject. A reader pitched the idea of “Green Beans Everywhere”, and that’s the one they ran with.

So now Hullabaloo is offering all five resulting songs for free from Bandcamp. The songs were written by Steve Denyes, Johnny Bregar, Matt Clark, the Hollow Trees, and Charity and the JAMband, respectively. Now, go and eat your greens.

 

by Cynthia Fuchs

5 Jul 2011


In 2003, a last herd of sheep made its way through Montana’s Absaroka-Beartooth mountains, taking over three months and covering some 150 miles. That journey is documented in Ilisa Barbash and Lucien Castaing-Taylor’s superb documentary, premiering on PBS on 5 July. For long stretches, the film observes sheep in motion—trekking along dirt roads, up and down mountainsides, through densely green forest trails or snowy fields. As a parable, the story of sheep seems unsubtle: they are herded, they are unthinking, they go along. As poetry, the film is stunning. With no narration and remarkably little conversation among the herders, it reveals the loneliness and day-to-day difficulty of living among sheep, as human labor and desire are reflected by their surroundings—their bleating charges and also the land they all traverse. “I’d rather enjoy these mountains than hate ‘em,” says one man. You need faith, persistence, and extraordinary patience to herd sheep, whether the job is handed down in families (as it is so often), a refuge or an adventure. The herders spend most of their days apart, that is, on opposite sides of their herd, atop their horses, directing dogs and smiling occasionally at each other. The film is neither nostalgic nor romantic, but instead shows how this hard life has effects, good and bad, that it presses workers to their own edges and also helps them to discover themselves as well as the world around them.

See PopMattersreview.

by Josh Antonuccio

1 Jul 2011


1. “Independence Day” – Bruce Springsteen


Springsteen’s reckons with his father in this utterly mesmerizing and heartbreaking take on the breakdown of Father and Son from The River, with the Boss ultimately lamenting that he has to “say goodbye, it’s Independence Day” as he departs from his father.

by Kate Dries

1 Jul 2011


Britney may not hate the Man, but she definitely hates the paparazzi. Her latest video for “I Wanna Go” is no exception; Britney welds a microphone like its a whip, knocking men to their feet while smiling, and quickly turning from sweet to sour during a press conference.


But this isn’t the first time we’ve seen Britney hate on her constant watchdogs.

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