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by Ryan Reed

18 Jul 2010

Appalachian Voices, a folk group comprised of singer-songwriter Daniel Martin Moore, cellist/vocalist Ben Sollee, and, most famously, singer/songwriter/guitarist Yim Yames (The Artist Formerly Known as Jim James) of My Morning Jacket, is about to embark on a nine-date tour of the US, starting on July 22nd at the Opera House in Lexington, Kentucky.

Solle and Moore released an album, Dear Companion earlier this year (produced by James), but this month marks the first live performances of this trio formation. 

However, there’s more than just pretty music here—there’s a message, too.  The venture is hoped to raise public awareness about the controversial practice of Mountaintop Removal coal mining, which takes place throughout Appalachia.

According to James’ website, “a portion of the proceeds from the tour will benefit Appalachian Voices, for which the tour was named, an organization devoted to ending mountaintop removal coal mining together with diverse environmental problems impacting the central and southern Appalachian Mountains.”

Be sure to catch them for one of these unique and intimate performances.

07/22/10   Lexington, KY The Opera House US
07/23/10   Knoxville, TN The Bijou Theater US
07/25/10   Charleston, WV Mountain Stage US
07/26/10   Marlinton, WV Pocahontas Opera House US
07/27/10   Charlottesville, VA Jefferson Theater US
07/29/10   Woodstock, NY Bearsville Theater US
07/30/10   New York, NY Music Hall Of Williamsburg US
With Special Guest The Preservation Hall Jazz Band
07/31/10   Newport, RI   Newport Folk Festival   US (Yim Yames Solo)
8/01/10       Newport, RI Newport Folk Festival US (Ben and Daniel)

by Matt Mazur

16 Jul 2010

First Film: George Miller’s Lorenzo’s Oil (1992)

Must-see: You Count on Me (Kenneth Lonergan, 2000); Jindabyne (Ray Lawrence, 2006); John Adams (Tom Hooper, 2008)

Star Turn: The Savages (Tamara Jenkins, 2007)

Underrated: the gloriously wicked Bertha Dorset in Terence Davies’ adaptation of The House of Mirth (2000)

Upcoming, Current and/or Recent:

by Michael Underwood

16 Jul 2010

In this third episode of the Legion of Extraordinary Dancers, a man with no memory is implanted with a bizarre artifact and is plagued by convulsions which render his movement artificial and robotic.

He is brought back to health and wholeness by a reluctant nurse, who connects with the man in a touching love story. 

The use of comic-sans text instead of spoken dialogue heightens the stylized reality of the episode, and I’m glad to see some more female characters in a important role (as featured dancers and not just supporting characters), as I’d worried about that a little with the first couple episodes.

by J.M. Suarez

16 Jul 2010

Paste Magazine presents Live at Moog with Rogue Wave. These live performances were recorded at the Moog Music sound studio in Asheville, NC and include three songs (“Good Morning”, “Sleepwalker”, and “Stars and Stripes”) from the band’s most recent album, Permalight. The studio is located in the actual Moog factory and offers the band the opportunity to play around with a variety of Moog instruments and gear. Live at Moog is currently in its second season, so be sure to check out the links to past performances by bands such as Yo La Tengo, Amanda Palmer, Joseph Arthur, and Medeski, Martin, and Wood, among others.

by Matt Mazur

15 Jul 2010

Criteria for these choices includes risk-taking and confronting challenging material with little concern for vanity; an overall sense of favorable critical response as well as awards and other accolades; choices of collaborators, and finally the overall quality of the work; the execution.

First Film: Ladies Man ( Jacques-Gérard Cornu, 1960), opposite Danielle Darrieux and Mel Ferrer.

Must-see: Repulsion (Roman Polanski, 1965); The Last Metro (Francois Truffaut, 1980); A Christmas Tale (Arnaud Desplechin, 2008)

Star Turn: Belle de Jour (Luis Bunuel, 1967)

Underrated: 8 Women (Francois Ozon, 2002)

Upcoming, Current and/or Recent: André Téchiné‘s The Girl on the Train was recently released on DVD.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

READ the article