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by Stuart Henderson

12 Aug 2011


Chaplin’s influence cannot be overstated—a true auteur, he would go on to craft a series of stirring, gorgeous, hilarious, simple parables which, while endlessly entertaining, never steered far from their social message. A committed socialist—he would eventually be treated as a subversive agent in the US in one of their more foolish moments of anti-communist idiocy—Chaplin’s filmography is underpinned by a persistent and stirring attack on the de-humanizing power of a faceless capitalist machine. His most indelible moments rely on the juxtaposition between the softness of humanity and the unbendable steel of progress. It’s hard to think of a better visual metaphor for this than the scene early in his Depression-era satire Modern Times when his Tramp character literally gets caught in the gears of a machine. Both amazingly funny and utterly convincing as a visual metaphor, here was the genius of Chaplin. An entertainer with a purpose. Chaplin died on Christmas Day, in 1977, at the age of 88.

Read the rest of the entry within our 100 Essential Directors series.

by Andreas Stoehr

12 Aug 2011


It’s easy to throw around the phrase “godfather of independent cinema,” but actor-turned-director John Cassavetes earned it with his sweat and blood. His move out of the Hollywood system is the stuff of film history legend, and he set a powerful example, showing just how much a rogue, impassioned filmmaker could accomplish. Between Faces in 1968 and his death from cirrhosis in 1989, Cassavetes directly a series of visceral, highly personal dramas that still feel caustic, and fresh. Forged through sacrifice and suffering, his films contain some of the greatest performances you’re likely to see.

Read the rest of the entry within our 100 Essential Directors series.

by Jane Jansen Seymour

12 Aug 2011



The Forms released an EP called Derealization back in February, which provides a fresh look at earlier material by the Brooklyn band with remixes and new vocalists. Their song, “Fire to the Ground”, is now helmed by the distinctive baritone of the National’s Matt Berninger. A video treatment was filmed recently on quaint Minetta Lane in New York City, yet it skewers the notion of a cheerful group dance with dizziness-inducing direction by Chunwoo Kae and Ryan Demier of Neue Films. The clean lines of choreography by Lily Baldwin (who has worked with David Byrne among others) belie the underpinning of danger inherent in the music. It all makes for compelling viewing while listening to this haunting tune. And FYI a new release, Choas of Forms, is due out August 16.

by Jennifer Cooke

11 Aug 2011



Applause all around for the sheer hipsterism of Nokia’s marketing department, where the boardroom might look more like Vice Magazine than Samsung. Nokia has been using indie rock to hype it’s N8 smartphone with a series of Live Sessions filmed entirely with the phone. The lineup so far includes Cults, Transfer, Portugal the Man, he Vaccines, Mona and Ben Howard.

by Timothy Gabriele

11 Aug 2011



Released through 502 Recordings, homebase of the excellent DJ Oneman, this collaboration between Desto, Clouds & Jimi Tenor is tenaciously caught inbetween the dancefloor and the chillout room. The familiar jazz flute sounds that have traversed sampledelic music for 20 years now appear, but juxtaposed against fat synthetic bass lurching along an ominous beat. The video takes the song’s name quite literally, showing dancing “birds” (or women, as some us call them) of the silent era moving in synch with the modern sounds.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Exposition Dumps Don't Need Dialogue in 'Virginia'

// Moving Pixels

"Virginia manages to have an exposition dump without wordy exposition.

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