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by PopMatters Staff

5 Aug 2011


Sole aka Tim Holland recently released his third album with the Skyrider Band titled Hello Cruel World, which seems particularly apropos to reference on a day following a 500-plus drop in the Dow. But really this is not as cynical as it sounds. In fact Sole sees his current music as fully embracing the artistic possibilities of the DIY sensibility and all of the personal freedom and responsibility that DIY implies. On Hello Cruel World, he and his band have teamed with a number of indie’s leading lights, including Xiu Xiu, Pictureplane, Sage Francis, and more. This new tune “Immortality” features a collaboration with animation artist, Dave Lando. Sole said of the video, “It’s a song about futurist/inventor Ray Kurzweil and the modern search for immortality, we teamed up with Decadence Comics artist Dave Lando to create a pretty interesting ‘hard science fiction’ animation.”

by Jacob Adams

5 Aug 2011


Just a couple weeks after their acclaimed performance at Chicago’s Pitchfork Music Festival, tUnE-yArDs made their national television debut (Monday, August 1) on Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. With the addition of ?uestlove on drums and Black Thought even rapping a verse near the end of the tune, this song is brimming with unbridled energy. Let’s hope the spontaneity and utter joy of this performance will bring Merrill Garbus’ insanely creative music to a larger audience.  It deserves to be heard by everyone.

by Joseph Fisher

5 Aug 2011


Best Coast has just released a teaser track as a thank you to the band’s fans. Titled “How They Want Me to Be”, the song has a “99%” chance of appearing in a different form on their second album. Below are Cosentino’s kind words to her fanbase.  ou can listen to “How They Want Me to Be” over at Soundcloud.

You guys have been some of the most wonderful fans this past year, and I want to thank each and every one of you for supporting Best Coast. When times are rough for me, and I am traveling and not sleeping, and am worried about daily life, it always makes me feel better to know that my fans are out there.

I know I’ve been talking a lot about our second album, but it’s still very far away from being created. I wanted to share a bit of life from recent Best Coast with you guys, so I thought I would post this song for you all to hear as a little teaser for the album.

This song was recorded a few months ago at Black Iris, the same studio we recorded “Crazy For You.” This song is not properly mixed, it’s mostly a rough studio demo of a song I wrote and wanted to record. I am about 99% sure that this song will get re-recorded and changed up a bit and will end up on our second album. It’s called “How They Want Me To Be.”

It’s just a small taste of what’s to come, and I wanted to give you guys something to get excited about since you’ve been the best fans in the whole world!

I am off to New York to start a weekend of fly in dates, so wish me luck, and I hope you all love this song and I can’t wait to record more.

Love,
Bethany

by Joseph Fisher

5 Aug 2011


Watch below as Explosions in the Sky blow the roof off Letterman with an abbreviated version of the song “Postcard from 1952” off of their latest album Take Care, Take Care, Take Care.

by Tomas Hachard

4 Aug 2011


Bernardo Bertolucci emerged in the 1970’s as a strong figure in Italian cinema. Starting with Spider’s Stratagem (1970) and, in particular, The Conformist, Bertolucci set himself apart with a thematic and visual style of his own.

Starting in the mid-1970s, Bertolucci’s films increasingly focused less on Italy. Last Tango in Paris explores the free love mantra of the 1960s through the affair between a older widower and younger woman. The Last Emperor, for which Bertolucci won an Oscar, details the life of China’s last emperor as the country turns into a Republic and then a Communist dictatorship. Then, beginning in the late 1980s, Bertolucci’s films began to reflect a conscious turn from overt political messages. Due to the nature of his past films, though, this absence in his later work in the end makes its own political point. Nevertheless, regardless of the topic or locale, Bertolucci’s films remain unmistakably his: poignant, nuanced, critical, and majestic.

Read the rest of the entry within our 100 Essential Directors series.

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