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by Matt Mazur

5 Apr 2011


When discussing female filmmakers, it is nearly impossible to not include Columbia University’s role in introducing new talent into the industry. The first woman to ever win a Best Director Oscar, Kathryn Bigelow for The Hurt Locker, is an alum, as are Lisa Cholodenko (The Kids are All Right), Nicole Holofcener (Please Give), Courtney Hunt (Frozen River), and Kimberly Pierce (Boys Don’t Cry).

This year, a new generation of women from Columbia will showcase their short films at the festival. Of note, and not to be missed, are Gina Atwater’s Crossing, Christina Choe’s I Am John Wayne, and Olivia Newman’s First Match. The subjects of these films eloquently range from a young female wrestler going to the mat for the first time, to an impoverished young man riding a horse through the streets to Coney Island, to a period piece about Southern racism.

by PopMatters Staff

5 Apr 2011


Foo Fighters’ latest album drops next week and, as is becoming habit, an early stream is available… this one via Soundcloud. The album is the band’s seventh and was produced by Butch Vig. Interestingly, the bulk of the tunes were recorded in Dave Grohl’s garage. Now how’s that for back to rock and roll basics.

  Wasting Light by Foo Fighters

by Evan Sawdey

5 Apr 2011


The title—Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind—is kind of wacky.  The content, however, is downright unpredictable.

Greg Allen crafted “Neo-Futurism” after spending much time studying the Italian Futurists while at Oberlin College, eventually bringing Too Much Light to Chicago in December of 1988.  Since then, this show—wherein 30 plays are performed within one hour, the plays themselves changing on a weekly basis—has not only become the longest running show in Chicago, but has also spawned a branch out in New York as well.  Between his work with the Neos, Allen has also written and directed plays all around the country, often to great acclaim.

Here, in this exclusive interview with PopMatters, Allen sits down with us to discuss the Neo-Futurist aesthetic, responds to the charge that Too Much Light is “short attention span theatre”, and attempts to turn a table upside down with only the help of audience applause ...

by Chris Colgan

4 Apr 2011


Photo: Shawn Brackbill

The idea of adding synthesizers to progressive rock is nothing new, but no band has made it sound quite as refreshing and deep as the Pittsburgh-based duo known as Zombi. On the surface, bassist Steve Moore and drummer A.E. Paterra may not look like much, but with the addition of the synth elements to their sound, there may as well be twenty people in Zombie instead of two. The rich color and intricate layering of their instrumental prog rock is entrancing, recalling instrumentals by Pink Floyd and the sound shifts of mid-‘80s Rush. Letting the synthesizers do the talking, Zombi’s newest album Escape Velocity is a tutorial in utilizing seemingly disparate elements for synergistic, harmonized outcomes. Listen to “Slow Oscillations” here for proof, as Zombi prove themselves in under three minutes to be more enthralling than most bands can be in twice that amount of time.

Zombi’s new album Escape Velocity is out May 10th on Relapse Records. You can pre-order the album in various packages, as well as purchase their back catalogue, at this location.

by Martin Zeller-Jacques

4 Apr 2011


Joss Whedon once claimed that he and his friends loved shows like Dawson’s Creek and Party of Five but that they really didn’t have enough rocket launchers or people kicking each other in the face – something that explains a lot of the unique pleasure of Buffy the Vampire Slayer.  Fans of Whedon’s style of action-heavy teen angst might also want to take a chance on the upcoming Aussie action spectacular, Tomorrow, When the War Began.

Based upon the book of the same name by John Marsden, a popular novel for teens and common set text in Australian schools, the film is the first of a planned trilogy of Australian-made action blockbusters.  Already out in the Antipodes, it’s been garnering praise from fans of the novel and a generally positive critical reception, but in the UK we’ll have to wait until April 8th for our fix of meaningful teen bonding and hardcore ass-kicking.

//Mixed media
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Bad Graphics Are Still Impressive in ‘Spirits of Xanadu’

// Moving Pixels

"Spirits of Xanadu wrings emotion and style out of its low fidelity graphics.

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