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by John Garratt

24 Jun 2010

Earlier in the year, I was smitten with one of my new assignments; the debut album Creesus Crisis by a Calgary avant-garde trio called No More Shapes. I loved the shambolic nature of this certain music that didn’t seem to have a name. And not because its creators where trying to be esoteric, but because it just seemed to fall out of the sky that way. It was naturally weird.

I ran down the rabbit-hole with that one. Their label, Drip Audio, has some truly special talent on their roster including Peggy Lee (the cellist, not Ms. Fever), Butcher/Müller/van der Schyff, and my new personal favorite Inhabitants. Their latest album A Vacant Lot is so indescribably rich and odd, so very startlingly… ah, hell, I’ll just say it… original, that I easily would have given it at least an eight if it were one of my assignments. In a few words, this quartet is able to push their sound to wherever their muse fancies, making cascading trumpets and billowy guitar feedback sound like mere child’s play.

Many thanks to the Drip Audio rep who directed my attention to Inhabitants. Hopefully I can bring more people to their attention.

by Adele Melander-Dayton

24 Jun 2010

Casual cyclists and confirmed bike fanatics alike will appreciate (and yes, probably drool over) this spare, beautifully curated exhibition featuring handbuilt bicycles. 

Bike builders include Sacha White of Vanilla Bicycles based in Portland, OR, Italian designer Dario Pegoretti, and Peter Weigle of JP Weigle Cycles in Lyme, CT. 

The bicycles shown are gorgeous (luscious powder coats, hand-tooled leather seats) but also represent technical innovation in the shape of ultra-lite frames, unique cargo solutions, and specially designed off-road tires. The exhibition carries a healthy dose of whimsy: a favorite piece is the Delilah Sue tricycle, designed by White for his young daughter. It isn’t difficult to see why Vanilla Bicycles currently has a five-year-long waiting list. 

Bespoke reminds us that bicycles can serve many functions. They’re an extension of personality, a purely practical way to get around town, or a statement about energy consumption. Yet above all, this collection of bikes represents the most appealing aesthetics in two-wheeled design.


by L.B. Jeffries

23 Jun 2010

Appreciating this clip from Everyday Shooter takes some explanation if you’re unfamiliar with how the game works. Everyday Shooter is an emergent music game, which means that the normal beeps and pews have been replaced with sound effects meant to compliment the background track. Everytime the glowing dot hits something with a bullet, a unique guitar note is struck. Keeping everything musically coherent is very difficult and even the most talented designers opt for House music or techno to make the work easier.

Everyday Shooter is unique in this already small genre because it draws on inspirations like Steve Reich’s Electronic Counter-Point along with a hefty amount of Don Caballero. The music is almost entirely electric guitar, performed by programmer and designer Jonathon Mak. Some tracks work better than others depending on your tastes, but all are designed conceptually as songs because of how rigidly you have to play to have much chance of survival. For that reason the game is brutally difficult. Each level is its own track and designed completely differently from the other. Enemies do not repeat, you have to study each level individually and figure out how to win. By doing so, the level’s song starts to make more sense and come together the more you play. The video is from the last level. It’s a moody and cathartic guitar solo, which is appropriate considering how hard it is to get to this point in the game.

by Jonathan Simrin

23 Jun 2010

A Michel Gondry-directed, Seth Rogen-written action comedy at first seems like a pretty random collaboration. Is it random enough to work? Well, the trailer does not seem to give an aye or nay. It has all the staples of a big budget superhero film, with a tragic origin story, city corruption, car-mounted machine guns, a generous dose of comedy, and Cameron Diaz as a sexy secretary. Rogen certainly brings his signature lovable loser style of humor, but there’s not a bong to be found here. Rogen stars as an heir to a media empire, who finally makes something of himself when he crosses paths with Kato (Jay Chou), who brings all the gadget-savvy know-how to their vigilante operation. It’s unclear how good the film will be, since the trailer is really just showcasing what’s expected of an action comedy (Christoph Waltz as villain—check!). Still, it’s hard to believe this is the same director who made The Science of Sleep and Be Kind Rewind.

by Matthew Blackwell

23 Jun 2010

Clinic has announced that their sixth album, titled Bubblegum, will be released on Domino October 4 (UK) and October 5 (US). Domino has also provided a brief medley of the album.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

READ the article