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by PopMatters Staff

16 Aug 2016


Chris Ingalls: Judging from the deadened delivery, GAIKA is seemingly numbed by what’s happening to his city. The brutality and violence is palpable in the track, with music stabs and samples that seem to bring to life the unrest. Musically, it’s diverse yet danceable (although the starts and stops create the requisite drama). Yet another reason why, when looking for new voices in hip-hop, you need to cross the pond. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

16 Aug 2016


Photo: Suzy Poling

Chris Ingalls: Daveed Diggs has rightfully established himself as an eclectic powerhouse thanks to his Grammy- and Tony-winning performance in Hamilton, and returning to his experimental hip-hop outfit Clipping. is a reassuring sign that he’s not content resting on his laurels. From their upcoming album Splendor and Misery, “Baby Don’t Sleep” is full of restless sonic experiments like static, distortion and myriad sound effects, but it’s Diggs’ rapid-fire rhymes that tie the whole thing together. For anyone who thinks hip-hop is getting stale, listen to this refreshing revelation. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

16 Aug 2016


Chris Ingalls: NAO’s “R&B on helium” pipes serve this song well, creating an atmosphere of (perhaps) misleading innocence. Her voice mixes nicely with the unique dynamics of the music, which comes in sparsely during the verses and crashes in, anthemically, during the powerful choruses. The spacey keyboard solo before the final chorus is a fun, retro treat, as is the little funky keyboard/guitar coda. [8/10]

by Will Rivitz

15 Aug 2016


LOVECAT‘s “Song For Eternity” is a playful, bouncy synthpop piece, a strange choice given that its subject matter is the eternally masochistic struggle to make good art. In some sense, though, this is a fair approach — the best art often sounds effortless, and couching the realities of creation in springy synths and dance-ready drums bridges that divide between appearance and what lies beneath. It’s a line LOVECAT toes pretty frequently — his subject matter often dour, its instrumental bedding often light. If “Song For Eternity” shows anything, it’s that this duality can still sound cohesive.

by Will Rivitz

15 Aug 2016


“You make me want to dance to the music,” sings Robert Finley, and it’s pretty hard not to sympathize. “You Make Me Want to Dance” is a slab of dirty, sexy soul, gyrating around a firm funk backbeat in much the same way as most pairs of hips exposed to this song might. Finley’s Southern croon soars above sensual guitar and horns, reveling in the freedom the music provides and exploring the crannies of the instrumentation. If you need something to get you moving this Monday, this should be the ticket.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Virtual Reality and Storytelling: What Happens When Art and Technology Collide?

// Moving Pixels

"Virtual reality is changing the face of entertainment, and I can see a future when I will find myself inside VR listening to some psych-rock while meditating on an asteroid.

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