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by PopMatters Staff

8 Apr 2016


Klaus Johann Grobe create groovy Kosmische music that’s heavily influenced by the experimental electronic music that emerged from West Germany back in the late ‘60s and early ‘70s. The sound is metronomic and clean and entirely based on experimental music that has been going on in Europe for a good chunk of the 20th century. In this case, the “grooves” are based on regular patterns of repetition set primarily to the rhythmic tones of the metronome, a device heavily utilized in classical music. This isn’t groovy like Dam-Funk, but rather like Kraftwerk.

by PopMatters Staff

8 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: Just an “extract” from Colin Stetson’s reimagining of Górecki’s 3rd Symphony, “SORROW III” places its title in all caps for good reason. The track isn’t merely about “sorrow”, that passing sentiment of unhappiness that always allows recovery; rather, it is about this sentiment amplified tenfold, namely “SORROW”, a feeling of irreversible tragedy, of lives lost and loves laid waste. The soaring, operatic vocal is able to capture this feeling convincingly, and the nearly militaristic string arrangements backing it suggest that this “SORROW” may be the result of an act of jealous violence. [7/10]

by Sarah Zupko

6 Apr 2016


Photo: Shervin Lainez

Once upon a time, Gabe Dixon fronted the Gabe Dixon Band, which he formed back in 1999 while at the University of Miami as a piano-fronted Southern rock band. The band worked with Concord Records and earned comparisons to the Ben Folds Five. Fast forward to 2016 and Dixon is a solo artist with a hot new sophomore solo record, Turns to Gold, releasing Friday. Dixon still employs the rock energy, but he’s very much become an Americana artist now and the genre suits him to a tee, allowing him to get more soulful with his vocals and explore new sounds, while focusing on creating fundamentally craftsman-like songs that tell stories of peoples’ lives.

by PopMatters Staff

6 Apr 2016


Irish indie pop band Land Lovers look to the late ‘50s and early ‘60s for inspiration and focuses on creating little nuggets of delicious pop confection. For example on “Angeline”, which we are premiering today, one can hear the jangly pop guitars and pristine harmonies of the Searchers (think “Needles and Pins”). Land Lovers are no retro project though, they simply draw ideas from popular music of the past and then expand on them in a modern fashion. Land Lovers will appeal to fans of melodic guitar pop and anyone with an ear for a great hook. Like the great British pop band the Beautiful South, or Paul Heaton’s earlier project, the Housemartins, Land Lovers use ironic, critical and occasionally dark lyrics underneath the sheen of gorgeous music. It’s subversive and relevant, just what a memorable pop tunes needs.

by PopMatters Staff

5 Apr 2016


Graham Murawsky aka Factor Chandelier is about to release his fifth solo album, Factoria, that features an amazing batch of guest vocalists, including Open Mike Eagle, Awol One, Gregory Pepper, Ceschi, and Myka 9. Factor Chandelier conceived of this project as something of a concept album, telling the story of Factoria, a town that currently sits under Silverwood Heights in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Factor’s hometown.

Originally, the plan was to build a massive industrial city called Factoria. The project collapsed and the town’s remains are buried beneath Silverwood Heights. It’s a compelling project and today we bring you the premiere of “I Want to Go”. Rapper Kirby Dominant brings his unique voice to the table on the track “I Want to Go” when he asks: “How do you build a foundation in a shaky world?” Factor and Dominant are Paranoid Castle, and they describe themselves as the group you popped your first bottle of Veuve with or shared a “vodka soda with the lime”. This is classic hip-hop with soulful rhythms and modern beats that manage to evoke the past.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Moving Pixels Podcast Looks at the Scenic Vistas and Human Drama of 'Firewatch'

// Moving Pixels

"This week we consider the beautiful world that Campo Santo has built for us to explore and the way that the game explores human relationships through its protagonist's own explorations within that world.

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