Latest Blog Posts

by PopMatters Staff

25 Feb 2016


Sweden’s Dada Life (Olle Corneer and Stefan Engblom) have been around as a duo for ten years now and in that time they climbed the dance charts, played every major festival, built a massive fanbase and released a hugely successful record, The Rules of Dada (2012). Dada Life is so popular on the dance scene that several club dates have turned into riots after the clubs couldn’t contain the vast crowds. Now Corneer and Engblom are back with a banging new single “Tic, Tic, Tic” that features rocker Lzzy Hale from Halestorm on vocals. The song crackles with live energy and primal rhythm likely to turn the dance floor into a massive pogoing maelstrom of raised arms and blissed out faces.

by PopMatters Staff

24 Feb 2016


Evan Sawdey: Like many classic avant-garde electronic acts in the mid-to-late ‘90s, Illum Sphere are doing totally right with “Second Sight”. They’re looping the same big synth phrase over and over (and over) again, adding in new percussive elements as they go, which is all nice and good until that liquid, washed-out undercurrent kicks in and the group manages to land the finish, coming off like a long-lost Warp Records release despite the fact that not only has Ninja Tune been doing this for decades now, but they’ve been doing it better than just about anyone else. [7/10]

by Sarah Zupko

24 Feb 2016


Florida’s Terri Binion is a singer-songwriters’ singer-songwriter in that she’s greatly admired by the likes of Lucinda Williams, Jim White, Jimmy Webb for her meticulously crafted lyrics and consummate musicality. Binion has had a rough year or so, losing her beloved wife and both parents, all the while struggling long and hard for marriage equality. These hardships and her life’s journeys are the central concern of Binion’s new album The Day After The Night Before, of which new single “Burden Song” is but a part. “Burden Song” is musically based on her love of Antony and the Johnson’s “Shake That Devil” melded with lyrics depicting her long struggle for acceptance as a lesbian navigating the often hostile waters of contemporary America.

by PopMatters Staff

23 Feb 2016


Pryor Stroud: “The Big Big Beat” is an amphetamine-addled, dance-pop flirtation that forgoes innuendo and gets straight to the point, immediately putting its hands all over the boy it wants. Azealia makes no overtures; from the gun, her hyper-sexualized, get-what-I-want flow seems to single out a prospective lover, flip him around by his collar, and usher his hand up toward the edge of her skirt, all before he’s had his second drink. The throwback-house bass thump is just as uninhibited as the vocal it arouses into being, and both this bass and vocal, coalescing into one single erogenous nerve-string loosening and tightening between bodies, are lofted over a reverberating, clipped-up hype man sample that seems to be egging all this prurience on for his own perverted benefit. Azealia’s Estelle-esque chorus premonition— “Ooo, boy /  Ooo, boy / Ooo, boy, I think i know just what you need / Ooo, boy /  Ooo, boy / Ooo, boy, you need a taste of ecstasy”—casts her as an impatient tease making all the first moves: she’s the girl heading home from Michael Jackson’s oft-imitated “The Way You Make Me Feel” video, but here she’s leading the way, deciding what alleyways they take, and the Michael-figure is just along for the ride. [8/10]

by Sarah Zupko

23 Feb 2016


The Pacific Northwest has turned into a hotbed for American roots music in the past decade and there are now more string bands than you can shake a stick at within and around the hubs of Portland and Seattle. Left Coast Country is one such band, specializing in new takes on classic bluegrass, and burning up the stages with their energetic live performances. The group’s new record, Pines Fly By, releases February 27th, and to celebrate we are sharing a mournful, toe-tapping number “Burnin’ Old Pictures of You?”.

//Mixed media