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by PopMatters Staff

23 Mar 2016


Evan Sawdey: Credit goes to Four Tet, who has gone from cut-n-splice folktronica go-to to a grade-A dance and indie remixer. His style has morphed and changed in fascinating ways but here, with this Shura remix, he is going straight for the heart: a skittering-but-propulsive backbeat, plaintive-yet-effective synth pulses, and a warmth that has faint echoes of peak-era Annie. It’s not an out-and-out masterpiece, but Shura’s lovely, plainspoken vocals seal the deal, turning her original into a basement valentine delivered right to your pleasure center. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

23 Mar 2016


Emmanuel Elone: This song is seriously misleading. The song’s title makes it sound as if the track will be abrasive, dissonant, and full of pummeling riffs. Luckily, Maylight instead decided to create a jazzy electronic piece with some stellar female vocals carrying the song along. Light synths come in, but the horns and percussion deserve the most credit in adding personality and swagger to the full vocals laid on the track. “Heavy Artillery” could use some additional instrumentation to make it feel more organic and lively, and it doesn’t have as powerful a climax as it should have. Still, it’s a great song that successfully combines both jazz and electronic without having one overpower the other, and Maylight should be commended for maintaining that balance of genres throughout. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

22 Mar 2016


Chris Ingalls: Back with their first album in six years, the Posies are the power-popsters who make it all seem easy. It’s a credit to their talent that they can step into 2016 with an album that fits seamlessly into a music landscape that includes bands at least 20 years younger. “Squirrel vs Snake” is a solid single stuffed with smart wordplay, classic-sounding chord changes and gorgeous hooks—sort of like the Decemberists without the annoying Wes Anderson-isms. Welcome back, gentlemen. [9/10]

by PopMatters Staff

21 Mar 2016


Minneapolis indie rocker Mark Mallman has had a long and fruitful career for the past 20 years, keeping Midwest indie rock alive and thriving. For those who declare rock ‘n’ roll dead, Mallman convinces that rock can still give us something to believe in. Lead track “Hologram Jesus” makes that point right from the get-go as Mallman pleads that he’s desperate to feel something real. In his case it’s music and we leave convinced that music can be both a balm and a healing force.

by PopMatters Staff

21 Mar 2016


Photo: Eric Peterson

Brooklyn indie rock band the Loom will release the sophomore album, Here in the Deadlights, on April 22nd via Crossbill/Stereocilia. It was a long hard road getting to this point for the band as frontman John Fanning went through an emotional storm in his personal life that had him examining everything, including his music, as he rebuilt his life. While that process was painful and difficult, it afforded Fanning the opportunity of a rebirth, something he channeled into the Loom’s new music. The Loom has always been interested in repetition and grooves, things that are the primary concern of electronic music and it’s interesting how Fanning and the Loom are able to borrow dance music aesthetic elements and make them seem completely organic to indie rock. Here in the Deadlights is the first of two records that the band has ready to release as they have found so much creative inspiration drawing from the drama inherent in every day life.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

How a Song By Unknown Newcomer Adam Johnston Ended Up on Blondie's New Album

// Sound Affects

"Adam Johnston of An Unkindness wrote a song at 17 years old and posted it online. Two years later, magic happened.

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