Latest Blog Posts

by Steve Horowitz

1 Sep 2015


Steve Horowitz: This track is crammed. The lines range from everything from the biographical (“You want to know me I put my life in a song”) to the existential (“No love in the land of the lazy”) to the mundane (“I like rice, Basmati”) without ever dropping the beat or straying from the icy landscape of the sonic construction. There’s something happening here. Resolution may not be reached, but it’s a step. No wonder it ends with a sour vocal. Growth is painful. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

1 Sep 2015


Adrien Begrand: The UK hip-hop great’s new single is so simple in approach—a murky, nasty dub groove that creeps along menacingly—but it gives Rodney Smith ample room to deliver a pointed diatribe against the allure of money and society’s (music especially) perpetual willingness to bleed people dry. “How could we hate the Queen, when the social bill seems so obscene and it helped to create the scene that put the people where the people be here?” It’s food for thought. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

1 Sep 2015


Paul Duffus: Only two original members left, but the fire remains undimmed. “Cast the First Stone” is relatively mid-tempo for these heroic warlocks. Over the years they have been up, they have been down, but they have never backed off. And so it continues. This compares favourably with their past. [8/10]

by Adrien Begrand

1 Sep 2015


So we pronounce it “nervous lovers” then, right?

This latest addition to search-optimized indie band names (right up there with CHVRCHES and Alvvays) San Francisco band NRVS LVRS provide an aptly contemporary twist on indie pop. At its root is the same new romantic-derived sounds Stars have been excelling at for the past 15 years, but with smart additions of chillwave, electropop, and dreampop. The tactic works especially well on their debut album, which can be streamed in its entirety below in advance of its 8 September release date.

by Adrien Begrand

1 Sep 2015


Chicago’s Walsher Clemons is a jam band that know not just how to lock into a strong instrumental groove, but one that knows how to create a groove that actually moves. Described as a combination of Michael Jackson and Phish (with a little Steely Dan tossed in as well) this is sunny, Bonnaroo-friendly music that demands its listeners dance to their irresistible funk beats.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Double Take: The African Queen (1951)

// Short Ends and Leader

"What a time they had, Charlie and Rosie. They'll never lack for stories to tell their grandchildren. And what a time we had at Double Take discussing the spiritual and romantic journey of the African Queen.

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