Latest Blog Posts

by Eric Risch

22 Jul 2016


Photo: C. Collier

Encapsulating Black Sabbath, Jethro Tull, Dick Dale and Boston—whom guitarist Jay Winebrenner freely admits ripping off—in a span of less than three minutes, Portland, Oregon instrumental “micro prog” trio Blesst Chest has crafted its own theme song with “Blesst Chest Theme Song”.

by Will Rivitz

22 Jul 2016


Wrinkles make rootsy psychedelic rock with a revivalist kick, the kind of exquisitely-produced jams that have been bursting forth ever since Tame Impala broke through to mainstream consciousness. Separation Anxiety is an impressive collection of synthy goodness from the young band, synth twists and echoing guitar played straight for immediate effect. It lifts satisfying elements from the major trends in indie of late — Young the Giant’s pop savvy, Future Islands’ propensity for the anthemic, LCD Soundsystem’s spare misanthropy — and the result is an album well-studied and well-executed. It refines the wheel instead of reinventing it — and given the result, refining is plenty good.

by Will Rivitz

22 Jul 2016


The Chairman Dances’ “Dorothy Day and Peter Maurin” is — as only a song with that kind of title can be — a quietly fervent chronicle of the lives of the titular Catholic activists. It’s the kind of spirited indie rock lazy music writers describe without fail as “jangly”, shimmering verses dropping into a dusty, stomping chorus reminiscent of the wandering rock of Springsteen and Darnielle. Lyrically, it continues in the tradition of the aforementioned artists as well — it’s less a treatise than a scene, reflective and illustrative above all. It’s the kind of eternal indie rock which will survive as long as the guitar stays in style — and, given how well the song fits into this canon and how good the canon as a whole is, this is a fine thing.

by Will Rivitz

22 Jul 2016


Photo: Szabo Adams

National Park Radio’s straightforward rural folk and bluegrass is a pleasantly rustic sound, the audio equivalent of gigantic cedars and down-home cookouts. The Great Divide is comfortable, upbeat acoustic guitar strumming along to foot stomps and mandolin. It’s dance music in its most traditionally American sense: this is the stuff you waltz to around a campfire with your sweetheart. It’s joy filtered through the lens of Americana, and that simplicity in approach should be celebrated.

by Will Rivitz

21 Jul 2016


Alan Abrahams’ take on his own “Say It’s Going to Change” as Bodycode opens innocently enough, pleasantly eerie synths right out of Selected Ambient Works 85-92 backing a metallic, robotic house beat. Halfway through, though, everything changes: after a quick flare of upper-register whirrs, a twisty bassline thuds in, sending the track into more traditional !K7 territory. The remix masterfully pulls elements in and out of our reach, warm synths eventually dropping out in favor of an all-out bassline assault. Its slow transition from unfocused synth jam to functional dancefloor killer is yet another example of the absolute madness Abrahams can wreak on an unsuspecting mass of bodies crowded around his turntable.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Culture Belongs to the Alien in 'Spirits of Xanadu'

// Moving Pixels

"The symbols that the artifact in Spirits of Xanadu uses are esoteric -- at least for the average Western gamer. It is Chinese culture reflected back at us through the lens of alien understanding.

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