Latest Blog Posts

by PopMatters Staff

10 Feb 2016


Sarah Zupko: Throwing Shade critiques the phony plasticity and the anti-intellectualism of social media most effectively on “hashtag IRL”. The music is simple and the annoying hashtags are called out for a good reason, to highlight the essential impermanence and aural clutter of much of today’s internet, particularly the Twitterverse, but also our clickbait culture. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

10 Feb 2016


Sam Taylor: Premier purveyors of the weird Moderat return, collaborating for a third time with aural ally Apparat on “Reminder”, with a swirling techno soundscape that evokes Trentemøller’s music as much as it does In Rainbows-era Radiohead. The track’s press release claims that Apparat’s vocals present, “an unfiltered insight into his personal take on the journey we call life – he is opening up, discussing his shadow, his fears and doubts.” If “Reminder” is a good example of what’s to come, then new album III can’t come soon enough. [8/10]

by Sarah Zupko

10 Feb 2016


Atlanta producer Chris Hunt previously applied his compositional skills to the work of Cloudeater, but following the break-up of that outfit, Hunt has struck out on his own in developing the Tomb project. Juxtaposing wide cinematic flourishes with elements of jaggy noise that almost create a heavy metal effect, his new music is throughly visceral in some of the same ways as Rabit’s recent music on Communion.

by PopMatters Staff

9 Feb 2016


Stephen Wyatt: PUP’s anonymity will be short lived. They write anthems and odes the perils of puberty and the abyss of adulthood, and “DVP” is no different. Holding onto hardcore music’s finer elements—frenetic guitar work, drums peaking at the end of an amphetamine rush, and the admixture of screaming diatribes (“I need to grow up!”) and surfer melodies—PUP primes themselves for a future that would benefit for a revival in hardcore music. [8/10]

by Danilo Bortoli

9 Feb 2016


Piano music, even considering the neoclassical movement that sprouted (briefly) during the beginning of the last decade, is still regarded as a formalist type of art. It’s rare to see artists in the mainstream and even in the blogosphere break through the model. When such event takes place, we end up getting Max Richter‘s deeply rooted Romanticism or Nils Frahm‘s more agitated experiments.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Beyoncé and When Music Writing Becomes Activism

// Sound Affects

"The overall response to Beyoncé's "Formation" has been startlingly positive, but mostly for reasons attached to political agendas. It's time to investigate this trend.

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