Latest Blog Posts

by Evan Sawdey

23 Sep 2016


Photo: Katherine Copeland Anderso

Andre Cymone‘s place in history—as a childhood friend of Prince who was also his early bassist, to say nothing of his own unique solo career—is absolutely secure. For Cymone, however, that doesn’t mean he’s comfortable.

by PopMatters Staff

22 Sep 2016


British singer-songwriter Rumer steps away briefly from recording her own music on her new album, This Girl’s in Love: A Bacharach and David Songbook, to celebrate the timeless hits of Burt Bacharach and Hal David. Bacharach and David’s songs are known for their breezy sophistication where light as air melodic confections rest on top of complex harmonic structures. At first glance, a tune of theirs might seem simple, but the songs are incredibly rich and they require the very best vocal interpreters. Of course, Dionne Warwick is most known for her takes on Bacharach and David tunes and now Rumer is adding the music to her repertoire.

“I couldn’t have made this album five years ago,” says Rumer. “I think I’ve now got a wide enough emotional palette to draw on for these songs’ characters and stories. That kind of insight only comes as you get older.” Indeed. Hear Rumer’s take on the classic “Walk on By” now and check out This Girl’s in Love: A Bacharach and David Songbook when it releases October 21st via Rhino Records.

by Sarah Zupko

19 Sep 2016


William Clark Green nearly became a rancher, like many good Texans, but we’re thankful that music intervened in those plans as Green brings some real rock ‘n’ roll punch to his straight from the heart country tunes. Like many notable Texas singer-songwriters, Green takes his cues from the storied legion of Lone Star State songwriters who have gone before and brings in the energy of rock and attitude of outlaw country. It’s a potent mix that make Green a tremendous live performer. On this live version of “Sympathy”, Green brings down the house and shows a musician quickly maturing to take his place alongside Robert Earl Keen, Joe Ely, and Billy Joe Shaver. Green tells PopMatters that he’s “never written a song with that much emotion in it in 45 minutes, and will never do it again.”

by PopMatters Staff

15 Sep 2016


Norway’s Apoptygma Berzerk have made a name for themselves throughout Europe for their somewhat gothic synthpop that they describe as “futurepop”. The group formed back in 1989 at the very tail end of the new wave musical movement, which perhaps explains the darker turn in their music from earlier bands more inherently poppy. As the Cure and Depeche Mode evolved into heavier sounds, so too did Apoptygma Berzerk embrace the underside of the often bright and chipper synthpop of earlier ‘80s. Apoptygma Berzerk also have deep and ambitious goals as “The Genesis 6 Experiment” shows.

The band tells PopMatters that the track “unlocks understanding of mythology, legends, ancient history, and religious belief. The supernatural in the natural. The analogue roots of the digital tree.” It’s a stirring song laden with atmosphere and deep grooves. The song will appear on the band’s upcoming compilation, Exit Popularity Contest, due October 7th via the End Records. The album contains the group’s EP trilogy that only previously was available on vinyl.

by Sarah Zupko

12 Sep 2016


Caleb Klauder has been a singular force in the alt-country/string band scene in Portland, Oregon for many years with his influential band Foghorn Stringband as well as his storied solo career. Now, he is teaming with musical partner Reeb Willms, who he met back in 2009 at the National Old-Time Fiddle Contest, for a new album of 14 original songs, Innocent Road releasing September 30th, rooted deep in the world’s of bluegrass and country. The title tune “Innocent Road” is a super catchy, mandolin lead number with some jaunty riffs and gorgeous harmonies. Klauder and Willms meld together as a duo with the same naturalness as Chris and Morgane Stapleton.

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20 Questions: Rachael Yamagata

// Sound Affects

"After a four year break since her last album, Rachael Yamagata reveals a love of spreadsheets, a love for Streisand, and why it's totally OK to suck at playing guitar.

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