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Fortunately for fans of both Wes Montgomery and great jazz music, the 2012 release Echoes of Indiana Avenue won’t be the last set of undiscovered tunes by Montgomery to grace the world. That LP is being followed up now by in the Beginning, a two-disc compilation that spans the year 1949 to 1958. Of the many features in this voluminous set, five tunes in particular stand out, each of which have been languishing in Sony Music Entertainment’s vaults for upwards of 60 years.

“Far Wes”, which you can here exclusively below, is one such discovery. Taken from a 1955 recording session at New York City’s Columbia Studios (where Miles Davis would later record Kind of Blue), the song is produced by the now reputable Quincy Jones, then an up-and-coming producer. At the end of “Far Wes”, you can hear recording engineer Frank Laico call out, “Quincy, there’s a call for you!”

The all-too-easy to make generalization about the state of the Brooklyn music scene in 2015 is that it’s comprised of a bunch of white guy-led indie bands all trying to out-falsetto Thom Yorke. However, like any music scene, such sweeping generalizations don’t fully encompass the diversity of musical exploration that one can find if he really digs beneath the surface. Enter: Brooklyn Gypsies.

Having garnered props from BBC’s Gary Crowley, Oasis’ Liam Gallagher, and the Jesus and Mary Chain (who they have supported in live gigs), Wakefield, UK’s the Incredible Magpie Band have already made a distinct impression prior to the release of their debut LP, Introducing, which is out next week. These chaps sound like they just rolled out of a time capsule buried in the ‘60s, with the sounds and tropes of the UK pop scene of the era well imbued. Yet the band doesn’t merely go for the default Beatlemania poses; it also injects a modern indie sensibility into the proceedings, resulting in a record that has its feet firmly planted both in its own time and the past.

The Atlanta-based rock trio the Head, comprised of Jacob Morrell (guitar) and brothers Jack and Mike Shaw (drums and bass/vocals, respectively), has been dubbed with the title “Atlanta’s youngest rock ‘n’ roll veterans” by Blurt. These chaps may all be in their early 20s, but what they lack in years they more than make up for in their energetic brand of ‘90s-inspired rock music.

The Head are also not one to shy from thought-provoking topics in their songwriting. Below you can stream “It Ain’t Easy”, a tune which finds the trio exploring the sensitive and troubling topic of the Newtown school shooting. For more on this, read the band’s statement on the song.

//Blogs

The Best and Worst Films of Spring 2015

// Short Ends and Leader

"January through April is a time typically made up of award season leftovers, pre-summer spectacle, and more than a few throwaways. Here are PopMatters' choices for the best and worst of the last four months.

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