Latest Blog Posts

by Sarah Zupko

13 Jul 2017


Photo: Anna Webber via Rounder Records

Nashville’s Jillette Johnson possesses a deft songwriting touch that lends her music a deep sophistication. Her songs are confident enough to allow room for the aural equivalent of white space, which permits her music to breathe and build in intensity. Meanwhile, Johnson’s voice is a sheer honey-toned delight with gorgeous phrasing and attention to detail. Americana super-producer Dave Cobb sure liked what he heard as he has produced her sophomore album, All I Ever See in You Is Me, releasing July 28th via Rounder Records.

Johnson started playing piano at age five, was composing her first songs at eight, and began playing the East Village’s famed SideWalk Cafe at 12, so you know she’s a bonafide prodigy. Her latest song “Flip a Coin” highlights all of her musical gifts as it’s brilliantly written tune about fear. At only 27 years old, we are looking forward to many greats years of music from this talent.

by Jonathan Frahm

12 Jul 2017


Already a respected artist on the indie circuit for her work in lesbian folk duo the Lovebirds, San Diego singer-songwriter Lindsay White has gone on to maintain her passionate and deft knack for producing compelling music in her ongoing solo career. Her sophomore release, Lights Out, takes the often celebratory nature of music hitting our airwaves and flips it flat on its head. Born out of her very own series of unfortunate events, the record delves into themes regarding her real life loss of loved ones, helping a bandmate through manic episodes, divorcing a husband, and marrying a wife to the religious distress of those around her.

by Jonathan Frahm

10 Jul 2017


Rather than further expand the “basement soul” sound they’ve established in other rocking recent releases such as “A Deeper Blue” and “Press Play”, Philadelphia’s the Dull Blue Lights let reggae and Motown undertones pervade their grooving new single. As described by bassist Ben Parry, “‘All Or Nothing’ is what happens when you make the mistake of thinking that one break-up will dismantle your identity and destroy whatever purpose you were carving out for yourself. Then you get extra sad because, on top of it all, you can’t sing like Curtis Mayfield, but damned if you’re not gonna try.”

by A Noah Harrison

28 Jun 2017


Photo: Scott MacDonald

Terror Pigeon! (formerly The Terror Pigeon Dance Revolt!) is Nashvillian Neil Fridd’s vehicle for spilling his heart all over the place, in the style of “funcore” or “affirmationcore”.

Funcore is defined by dense and danceable synth music that underpins mantras of undying positivity, often echoed by the audience during performances. These dynamic live shows heavily involve fans in the form of games and props—designed to foster an inclusive and, well, fun environment. (Dan Deacon is a good reference point.)

by Jonathan Frahm

27 Jun 2017


Photo courtesy of artist

Whether it’s across the flatlands of his hometown of Stillwater, OK or through the hustle and bustle of Austin, TX, Johnny Dango has been a hard-working modern troubadour anywhere the world has taken him. Having played alongside the likes of Stoney LaRue and beside such artists as Billy Joe Shaver and Jerry Jeff Walker, Dango has put in his dues with the best of them as a country bluesman before pursuing a solo venture along the lines of psychedelic folk rock.

His latest single, “I Was Wrong”, plays along the lines of the legends he’s played along with, but with a cosmic overlay that all feels like a reflective honky-tonk in outer space. Dango says of the track:

“‘I Was Wrong’ says that even a cynical, jaded bastard such as myself can have his whole world turned upside down by a woman. So, it’s about admitting I was wrong about a lot of things in the context of relationships. A straightforward country song seemed to be a trusty & reliable vehicle for expressing it simply, while also asking the important questions—why do people cling to fairy tale notions of love? Why do so many girls go for scumbags? Why do I always feel like I end up getting burned by love, especially when I can admit I was wrong and my ladyfriend was right? Unfortunately, I still don’t have many answers and thus remain a cynical, jaded bastard.

I have a pal who’s bound and determined to write a string of absolutely gut-wrenchingly god-awful, horrible, terrible and incredibly catchy country songs so he can sell them to the Toby Keiths of the world and get stupidly rich off of people’s poor taste. ‘I Was Wrong’ really started as my answer to a few of his finer numbers, like ‘God & Delta Airlines’, ‘Beer Thirty’, ‘Whiskey Christmas’, and ‘The Rambling Mesothelioma Blues’. Once I started writing the lyrics, though, some actual honest feelings about my ladyfriend crept in, because I hadn’t been in a serious relationship in quite a while and didn’t really want to be in one, either, and then it had just sort of happened. So the song became a lot less of a joke, even though that rhyme of loyalty/royalty manages to keep it somewhat comedic for me. And the relationship ultimately crashed and burned, and that’s just hilarious, too. When I got around to playing it for people, a few of them told me it was a nice song, and I should record it. Otherwise, it might have remained a backyard neighborhood jam.

As far as recording ‘I Was Wrong’ goes, I just wanted to live in that world of 1970s smooth AM country gold for a little while. I think I sometimes subconsciously write in rhythms and sounds I’d like to hear while driving long distances. To me, the tune is rather formulaic, but then I also happen to think that the formula is a pretty good one, and I’d personally rather hear this kind of country music than the swill Nashville is currently churning out. But, I guess it’s easier to sell hick hop songs about trucks and tractors and rivers and parties to the bedazzled jean zombies. Maybe the MXR Phase 90 is the ultimate bedazzled zombie weapon. I don’t know. It’s done a good enough job of keeping them away from my shows.”

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