Latest Blog Posts

by Adrien Begrand

15 Oct 2015


California duo Yellow Red Sparks will be releasing their new EP New Fangs Old Pangs tomorrow, but why wait until then when we’ve got the entire thing to listen to right now? Combining gentle folk pop with warm, rustic Americana, Joshua Hanson and Sara Lynn Nishikawa bring lush vocal harmonies and an overall genial atmosphere to the already endearing arrangements. It’s a joy.

by Adrien Begrand

15 Oct 2015


It’s no big secret that Satan’s Satyrs love Blue Cheer. The Virginia trio are so enamoured with the legendary 1960s heavy rock progenitors that they played a special set at the 2013 Roadburn Festival consisting of nothing but Blue Cheer covers. Their excellent new album Don’t Deliver Us will be released on 30 October, and the track “Creepy Teens” is the Blue Cheeriest of their many Blue Cheer homages. Built around a wicked lead riff, it rampages for an exciting six minutes, bassist Clayton Burgess sneering away in his distinctly petulant voice.

by PopMatters Staff

14 Oct 2015


Timothy Gabriele: There’s a ton of ideas and acutely-executed little flourishes on this epically divergent number. As IDM, it holds my attention far longer than most of Aphex Twin’s last full length.  What it lacks most though is contrast. “Why don’t you fight”, the vocal implores, but the production doesn’t ever seem to rise to that level of drama. It’s too chilled to have its buzz harshed by a disintegrating floor. It’s too tempo-locked to have any of its many transitions amount to the sensation of progression. It’s too focused on the micro to consider why each Kafka-esque metamorphosis of sound would amount to a whole worth the sum of its parts. Hyperstasis, but enjoyable in its attention to detail. [6/10]

by Adrien Begrand

14 Oct 2015


Brothers Jared and Michael Bell might live at opposite ends of the country—Jared in Brooklyn, Michael in Phoenix—but their long-running project Lymbyc Systym sounds as cohesive as ever on the latest album Split Stones, which comes out on 16 October. Its combination of vintage synthpop, contemporary indie pop, and subtle traces of krautrock make for a shimmering, ebullient piece of work, and you can listen to the album in its entirety below.

by Adrien Begrand

14 Oct 2015


By the spring of 1981 Art Pepper was riding what would be the last creative wave of his checkered career before dying of a stroke a year and a half later. Incarcerated several times stemming from his heroin addiction, he enjoyed a very prolific period through the late-1970s and the turn of the decade, and in April 1981 55 year-old Pepper played a series of shows at New York’s iconic jazz club Fat Tuesday’s. Backed by pianist Milcho Leviev, bassist Georde Mraz, and drummer Al Foster, Pepper played five shows. An unreleased recording has been unearthed, remastered, and gorgeously packed into the CD/digital release Art Pepper Live at Fat Tuesday’s, which will be released 30 October on Elemental Music.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

U2's 'The Joshua Tree' Tour Reminds the Audience of their Politics

// Notes from the Road

"The Joshua Tree tour highlights U2's classic album with an epic and unforgettable new experience.

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